Today’s Nice Price or Crack Pipe Porsche is #525 out of 911 (isn’t that clever?) special edition “911s for the New Millennium.” It may have been the 911 for the new century, but is it’s current price a throwback to Porsche’s past?

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Last week over on Hooniverse we talked about hand-me-down cars, those that were once unaffordable for us working schlubs, but which now, owing to their age and reputation have reached a point where the cost of entry could make the experience worth considering.

Yesterday’s 2000 Saab 95 Gary Fisher Edition Wagon might be considered just such a car. Once going for a lofty fifty grand, it’s now offered in slightly worn-in form for less than ten per-cent of that. That was a price that earned the Saab a laudable 85% Nice Price win even though it lacked its eponymous bike and associated rack.

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I’ve seen a few Porsche 911s with roof racks, and man do they look funky. This 2000 Porsche 911 C4 is claimed in its ad, and by the plaque on its dash, to be one of only 911 “Millennium” editions, a sobriquet that comes available only once every thousand years give or take (leap years, remember) so you’re pretty much guaranteed its exclusivity.

What are the identifying factors that make a 911 a Millennium car other than that dash plaque? Well, there’s the Chromaflar Violet paint and an interior in Millennium Brown, a name that sounds like a kick-ass urban vigilante. These cars also received chromed Turbo Twist wheels, but this one comes with a set of aftermarket Antera alloys. And yes, Antera is Pantera without the P but the company’s logo is still a big cat head.

Anyway, back to the car. The Millennium 911s received some mechanical attention too, getting a modest bump in horsepower from their 3.4-litre water boxer six and a short-shifter for the six-speed box in front of that. The cars were all based on the Carrera 4 AWD chassis.

This one has GT3 bodywork, although the nose is a 997 bit and is in need of paint. Good luck matching the color-changing purple the factory put on the car. There’s a big wing out back so you’ll always know where the car ends when parking, and other that the wheels and the nose, it looks to be in decent and mostly stock shape.

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Inside the 148,000-mile car there’s some really nice leather, a black steering wheel wrap protecting or hiding the wood on the rim, and a general need for a day at the detailer. Nothing seems too egregious however and while the 996 has a dull-ass dash shared with the contemporary Boxster, at least this one has the fun color to spruce things up.

It also has an emergency hammer and what looks like a mobile phone mount on the passenger side so prepare to spend a morning with some GoofOff® cleaning the adhesive away. And when was the last time you saw a car with Nav and a cassette deck?

The ad doesn’t give much in the way of description as to the car’s mechanical condition, and yes this generation of Neunelfer is tainted by the—appreciably rare—IMS bearing failure issue. That’s not the only problem the early M96 engines suffered but if you’re going to buy a cheap Porsche you’re going to have to roll the dice when it comes to potential future expenses. And this is a cheap 911.

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You can get cheaper cars with the Porsche badge—924, 944, and yes even 928 cars will often go for less than this car’s $14,900 price, but then will they be as competent and fun to drive as this one might be?

What’s your take on this 911 for the New Millennium and that $14,900 price? Does that seem like the deal of the century? Or, does that price have you thinking you’ll just wait until the next Millennium rolls around?

You decide!

Harrisburg PA Craigslist (it’s also on eBay if that’s your thing), or go here if the ad disappears.

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H/T to NFRAP2V2 for the hookup!

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