1957 Chevrolet Landau Hearse for $35,000

Usually people buy a car because they think it will fit their lifestyle. Here's a Nice Price or Crack Pipe candidate that'll come in handy when your lifestyle is all over.

There are certain vehicles that serve so specific a duty that you might not think of them as daily transportation; Wreckers, Ice Cream Trucks, creepy Street Sweepers, or maybe a Hearse. But we don't want you to exclude such seemingly single-purpose conveyances from your car-buying options, as each may have worthy attributes that have gone unconsidered.

For example, let's take today's Nice Price or Crack Pipe contender- a 1957 Chevrolet Landau Hearse, built by the National Body Manufacturing Company of Knightstown, Indiana. Now, you might immediately dismiss it without even considering the nice-priciness or crack-piperdom of the $35,000 Buy-it-Now premium for this casket basket. But that would be a mistake, as a classic hearse has many qualities that warrant its consideration as an addition to your crypt garage.

In order to help you with this decision, we present, in descending order-

Jalopnik's Top 10 Reasons You Should Own a Hearse:

You live at home and your parents are really, really, really old
You like leading processionals
You see dead people
Your last name is Munster
You are a charter member of SuicideGirls.com (NSFW)
You're that creepy guy from Phantasm
You know a lot of dead folks who have places to go
Because for you, everyday is Halloween
It's a smile-maker
Three words: Necrophilia Road Trip

Now that we have determined the desirability of a hearse, let's have a "viewing" of this one. It's a '57 Chevy base, with a 30" frame extension, and the nicer of the two available raised-roof options. It is also, appropriately, funereal black. While it is currently resting in peace in Canada, the seller claims to be willing to depart with the car to survivors in either that country or the U.S.. He also states that it is the sole '57 Landau, but that's pretty hard to confirm, as this kind of modification didn't have extensive model-run documenting, or dental records. It has 60,000 (likely mostly low-speed) miles, and is claimed to be in use today, hence, should you purchase it, it's unlikely to be delivered to you D.O.A..

So, now that you know that you want one, and we've taken a look at this one, what do you think of the that price? Is $35,000 open casket worthy? Or is the seller making a grave mistake?

You decide!

eBay or go here if the ad becomes deceased.

Help me out with NPOCP. Click here to send a me a tip

[Coachbuilt.com]