Car And Driver Gives Five Reasons To Not Buy A Cheap Beater Car, We DisagreeCar And Driver realizes that while hybrids and alternative fuels may get all the hype, the solution for many people on fuel economy is still the simple old econo-bucket beater. However, they've come up with five reasons why buying something like a cheap old Geo Metro isn't a good idea. Car And Driver makes some valid points, but we're thinking we'd still rather have a old beater. Although our five reasons below the jump won't apply to most consumers — we think maybe consumers should just become more like us. Reliability: Sure, an old Geo may not be as reliable as a brand new Toyota, Chevy or Ford, but it's still more reliable than say, an old MG. Besides, "poor reliability" is just another way of saying "lots of character," and who doesn't want to have a car with a personality? Safety: Yes, a rusty Metro make a Brilliance look like a tank, but who's to say you can't install a roll cage and wear a fire-proof suit and a helmet? Besides, old Volvos make for good cheap beaters too, and they built their whole reputation on safety. Speed (or lack thereof): We enjoy driving— quickly. There's no way getting around that. But if your goal is saving fuel, do you really care how fast you're going? Besides, you'd be surprised at the perverse kind of enjoyment you get from trying to squeeze the maximum amount of MPG from an otherwise boring commute. Emissions: Actually, there's not really any arguing with this point. Fact is, your cheap old beater with a hole rusted in its catalytic converter (or even with an intact one) is going to spew more smog into the air than most any modern car. Though if you're running an old Mercedes diesel on biodiesel, you do get that delicious french fry scent from the tailpipe. Theft: So what if the baddies are more likely to jack your little hatchback? Just go out and buy another one for $80. Look at it as spreading the gift of fuel economy to your community.