Someone Grafted A Toyota Tundra Face Onto A Low-Mileage Toyota Land Cruiser And I'm Just Confused

Illustration for article titled Someone Grafted A Toyota Tundra Face Onto A Low-Mileage Toyota Land Cruiser And I'm Just Confused
Photo: Wyatt Pine

I’ve said it many times: America has some of the weirdest car cultures in the world, due largely to our lack of vehicle inspections. Germany, for example, would never allow someone to just swap one car’s face onto another — it’s madness. But that madness exists here in the U.S. in spades; just look at this low-mileage Toyota Land Cruiser with a Toyota Tundra face.

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A man named Wyatt Pine posted pictures of his North Carolina junkyard find onto the Toyota 80 Series USA Facebook page, along with the humorous caption “I think I may have found a new 2022 land cruiser in North Carolina.”

Over Facebook Messenger, he gave me a bit of background. “I just found it at a junkyard,” he told me. “The truck was a 96 or 97 landcruiser with a newer sequoia front and rear ended grafted onto it.”

According to Pine, the original owner contacted him about possibly trying to get the vehicle back from the yard, called JDM Automotive & Recycling in Maysville. I’ve tried connecting with that original owner to see why in the world he chose to do such an...extensive...facelift on an 80-Series Land Cruiser with only 92,371 miles on the odometer:

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Photo: Wyatt Pine

I’ll assume the Land Cruiser had serious body damage, and the Tundra bits (I think it’s a Tundra and not a Sequoia based on the rear lights) were just a way to cover up the scars. That’s the only way I can justify this...creation, though Pine says he didn’t notice anybody obvious signs of body damage.

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Photo: Wyatt Pine
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I’d really like to see this contraption up close because I can understand how one could graft the Tundra’s nose onto the Land Cruiser. You just unbolt the original fenders and hood, shave the Tundra’s Fenders to fit (and apparently re-shape the leading edge of the Land Cruiser’s door) and just bolt everything up.

But the rear quarter panel is where I have questions. How did this guy put a Tundra bedside onto a Land Cruiser? Like, how is this panel fastened to the vehicle? I see that it’s welded to an external “roll cage,” but what else is holding it there? Is it somehow welded to the original quarter panel?

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Photo: Wyatt Pine

I’m so confused. And yet, I can’t say I hate the way this Tundra Cruiser looks from the front. It’s kind of menacing.

Sr. Tech Editor, Jalopnik. Owner of far too many Jeeps (Including a Jeep Comanche). Follow my instagram (@davidntracy). Always interested in hearing from engineers—email me.

DISCUSSION

nekkidsnek
Nekkid_Snek

I... kinda dig it....? I think the current Tundra’s aesthetics would lend itself well to an SUV form.