For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye
Nice Price Or No DiceIs this used car a good deal? You decide!

GM used to sell their German cars here in the states as Buick Opels, while today a lot of new Buicks are Opels. There's nothing Buick about this Nice Price or Crack Pipe GT - well, except maybe the price.

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We've had two big Benzes this week, and while Monday's 6.9 came away with a Nice Price win, yesterday's 1991 560 SEC custom convertible went down in Crack Pipe flames due to an unfortunate combination of the unknown quality of its conversion to a drop top, and a price that 83% of you thought should also drop. Today, we're sticking with the Germans, but are going to give the three-pointed star a rest in favor of a lightning bolt.

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye

You know that look someone gives you when they're questioning the credulity of your statements or actions? Perhaps you're explaining to a significant other why you happen to be traipsing in at 4 AM smelling of well drinks and astroglide, and halfway through your defense you get one of those eye rolls that pretty much stops you dead and demands you ask - what, don't you believe me? Well, funny thing, today's 1972 Opel GT can do that same thing with its eyes.

The GT's hidden headlights are mechanically actuated and flip not up but over, rolling counter-clockwise like a pair of bloated whales washed up on its pointy nose. Flipping them is a console-mounted lever and makes for something to do when stuck in traffic other than fapping.

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye
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Painted a bright shade of orange you glad I didn't say banana, this restored GT looks a hell of a lot better than most and the re-builder has chosen to replace the 102-bhp 1,897-cc four cylinder with a fuel injected 2.4-litre out of a modern Opel. That may raise both the horsepower and drivability, but it obviously lowers the Pep Boya-ability of the car a bunch. Regardless, matched to that exchange student is a Getrag five speed, also an upgrade over the car's original four forward gears.

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye
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The shifter for that box sits between a pair of aftermarket Recaro buckets, in place of the original high-backed buckets. Hopefully those are as easily tilted forward as the factory seats as that's the only access to the GT's limited luggage space, the car lacking any external access out back. Door panels and dash look pretty good and the Opel-branded floor mats are rubber and ribbed for her enjoyment.

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye
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Outside, the paint is fresh and the pics indicate that the spray job was something better than one done by the Earl of Scheib, the car having been first stripped and hence now lacking tan lines. GTs had a modest quantity of chrome adorning their Clare MacKichan-designed body, but what's there on this one looks about as shiny as you might want. The fender-mounted mirror and ATS five-spoke wheels are each a take it or leave it proposition, but neither should be considered a deal killer here. Behind the chromed ninja star wheels, the seller claims the suspension has been upgraded with poly bushings, sway bars and KYB shocks. Overall there's not a lot that would need to be done on this Opel. The claim of 8,000 miles should be taken with a grain of NaCL, as it's most likely those done since it became agent orange.

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye
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First displayed as a styling exploration at the ‘65 Paris Auto Show, the production GT debuted in 1968. Evoking images of the concurrent Corvette in its lines, only significantly smaller, the GT's body was manufactured by the French contractor, Brissonneau & Lotz. With the vastly more practical and nearly as sporty Manta sharing dealer floors, the GT found fewer buyers than hoped, especially in the U.S.. In total, 103,463 were sold globally, and even a cursory review of those offered for sale today indicate that the GT continues to have only a tepid following. But that doesn't mean the car is without fans, and this particular car stands as testament to that.

Illustration for article titled For $14,000, this could be the Opel of your eye
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If you happen to be a fan, that might affect your opinion of this heavily restored GT's seller's attempt to restore some cash into his bank account. He'd like to restore $14,000 in there, and for that is offering some additional parts along with the car. What do you think, is that a price that would make this Opel a rare gem in your mind? Or, does that make this a GT that needs to GTFO!?

You decide!

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eBay or go here if the ad disappears. H/T to rollo grande for suggesting another GT, which led to this GT!

Help me out with NPOCP. Click here to send a me a tip, and remember to include your commenter handle.

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BTW- Yes, I know you can't see the poll. Vote in the comments, email help@gawker.com and let ‘em know, or put your vote on the back of a 100 dollar bill and mail it to 1 Jalopnik Tower NY, NY.

DISCUSSION

mike-mckinnon
Chairman Kaga

My uncle worked for a Dallas area Buick dealership in the late-60's, washing cars, ferrying parts, general gopher duties. After a few years of saving, and with an infusion from my granddad's death and subsequent insurance settlement, he bought a brand new Opel GT. Same color as the one here. His older brother was home from college with his latest acquisition soon after the purchase, a four-barreled, 390 CID Ford Fairlane, when they decided to drag race the a car with engine displacement measured in CC's against one measured in football fields.

There on Forrest Lane in North Dallas, my uncles lit 'em up. Either due to a combination of pot, model glue and liquid acid, or possibly sheer over-aggressiveness, my younger uncle guided his brand new Opel GT into a concrete retainer wall at close to 50 MPH mere yards beyond the launch. My older uncle, who had pulled away lazily yet still beat his brother with miles to spare never even saw the accident. He just continued on to the bar and didn't bother to find out what had happened until the next morning (my younger uncle went to jail, in case you were wondering).

Anyway, there's one picture of that car, taken the afternoon my uncle brought it home. It lives in a family photo album my mom keeps on the coffee table. Every time I see that photo I think about the tragedy of that car, and how much I'd love for it to still be in the family. I even looked for a GT for a few months before resigning myself to the reality that any car I could afford was beyond my skill level to make drivable. I could see myself buying this one, though. Just give me about a year to save.

Anybody want an Alfa GTV6? I can probably find the doors if you give me a few days.