Seems easy, right? Maybe not quite. Graphic credit: Jason Torchinsky

Earlier this week, we heard about an unfortunate accident where somebody crashed into a guy’s brand new 2017 Honda Civic Type R while he was on his way home from the dealership. Fortunately, the replacement parts appear to be available already so the car should be repairable. This gave us an idea—what would it cost to make a regular old Civic LX Hatchback look like the Type R?

We’re probably not the first ones to have such an idea as previous generation Type R badges, body kits, and other appearance items have been installed on every trim of Civic imaginable and they are so popular that the badges are often stolen. We’ll stick to the form-over-function formula preferred by the “my hood latch is broken” crowd and skip things like the 306 horsepower engine in favor of the cosmetics.

Pfft. I could hella make my DX look like that. My buddy once molded on a body kit and his shit looks fitted. Photo credit: Honda

The Civic Type R catalog is available online and parts can already be ordered from many online wholesalers at a discount of 10-25 percent off.

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Although there are discounted prices listed online, we’ll be using retail pricing for the purposes of our exercise. Shipping costs vary widely and we have so many large body panels that many discounters will not ship at all.

This is it. The face of the Type R. What do you mean the front bumper is store pick up only? Via HondaPartsNetwork

We’ll start with the front end of the car, which will require a complete makeover. Other than the upper center beam and the grille, most of the parts between the two cars are different. We’ll need to order a new bumper cover, along with the reinforcement bar that sits behind it since that part is unique to the Type R.

Does my car need a NACA duct? Yes. My car needs a NACA duct. Via HondaPartsNetwork

The bumper will also need all of the trim and garnish pieces along with the lower aero bits. We’ll need new headlights since our LX does not come with the upgraded LED units. The plain hood and fenders of the LX will also get replaced by the aggressive Type R hood with scoop and the flared fenders. Our list for the front end looks something like this:

  • Front Type R Emblem: $77.03
  • Front Red H Badge: $57.73
  • Front Bumper Cover: $468.97
  • Front Bumper Beam: $464.13
  • Front Air Spoiler: $118.75
  • Front Lower Air Spoiler: $82.23
  • Front Bumper Plate: $307.23
  • Left and Right Garnishes (Fog Light Trim): $100.42 each
  • Lower Bumper Mesh: $202.38
  • LED Headlight Assemblies: $671.88 each
  • Headlight Adapter Harnesses: $139.99 – We need these because the Type R uses unique headlight plugs.
  • Fog Light Assemblies: $203.53 each
  • Hood: $545.48
  • Hood Scoop with Hardware: $203.68

Since we are just going for the look, we skipped a few functional items like the induction plates that hide behind the bumper in order to direct airflow. Even so, our total comes out to $4,479.29 and we still have to paint everything.

This makes my car go faster, right? Via HondaPartsNetwork

Wheels, tires, and brakes are up next on the list as we move down the car. The front brake package is fairly inexpensive as the Brembo calipers retail for $304.95 each but unfortunately we can’t use them on the LX due to the bolt pattern. The LX along with most other small and midsize Hondas uses the 5x114.3 bolt pattern but the Type R uses the larger 5x120 bolt pattern which is also found on the Ridgeline and Pilot. The reason for the change in bolt pattern is likely due to torque produced as the bigger bolt pattern comes with a beefier hub and bearing assembly.

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The Type R front suspension is also unique so swapping over to the larger hub would likely require transplanting the entire front suspension. I am sure that one of the aftermarket companies will come up with a rotor that can use the Type R Brembo caliper but for now the best we can do is some red paint and buying some replica wheels for $560.

Aw yea, there’s the spoiler. Forget all the other crap, that’s what I need. Via HondaPartsNetwork

Continuing on towards the back, the rear fender flares appear to be part of the sheetmetal so we cannot buy those separately. We’ll have to live with the narrow flares or find an aftermarket solution. Much like the front, all of the rear is unique save for a few bolts and clips so we’ll need to replace the bumper along with all of the aero bits and trim. Let’s run down that list and see what our total is:

  • Rear Bumper Cover: $290.87
  • Rear Bumper Beam: $204.63
  • Rear Reflectors: $29.90 each
  • Rear Lower Garnish: $180.42
  • The Griddles or Side Garnishes: $111.25 each
  • Rear Center Garnish: $107.08

Our total for the rear doesn’t seem as bad as the front since it only comes in at $1065.30 but we still need to cover all of the hardware mounted on the rear hatch so let’s see how all of that adds up.

  • Tailgate (Hatch): $611.05
  • Center Garnish: $157.08
  • Left and Right Rear Roof Garnishes: $126.58 each
  • Upper Spoiler Center Assembly: $818.75
  • Left and Spoiler Wing Brackets: $717.76 each
  • Spoiler Covers: $44.72 each
  • Rear Type R Emblem: $79.22

Surprisingly, the huge spoiler that sits on top of the hatch is the most expensive piece as it comes out to almost $2,300 when all of the pieces are added up. Adding the tailgate and other garnishes bring our total to $3,399.50 for the hatch section.

Blah blah blah How much for the badges? Via HondaPartsNetwork

Adding all of the sections together gives us a grand total of $9,504.09, and we can conservatively say that we will need at least $2,000 to paint all of these new body panels.

In the end we will be out over $11,000 and only have an LX that partially looks like a Type R. Even then, we’ll be missing the sharp red interior and, you know, the actual driving experience.

Adding all this to the $20,000 price of a basic LX gets us within a few thousand of what an actual Type R retails at. Honestly, saving up for the real thing might be worthwhile.