Photo: AP

As Tesla prepares to ramp up production of the new Model 3 to reach a target of 20,000 a month by the end of the year, the automaker’s reconfiguring options and, it turns out, pricing of the more-expensive Model X. The price for the all-electric crossover is now $3,000 less, according to Electrek.

The change came as part of a makeover to Tesla’s online design studio, which included making certain options standard on the performance versions of the Model S and X, reports Electrek.

Before Tesla launched the Model X, Elon Musk said that the company aimed to make it about $5,000 more expensive than a Model S with similar options.

But that never exactly happened until now.

The current base Model S 75D starts at $74,500, while the Model X 75D started at $82,500 until last night.

But after a $3,000 price drop today, the Model X 75D now starts at $79,500 with the standard 5-seat configuration or exactly $5,000 more than a Model S with similar options.

The automaker told Electrek in a statement that the decision was made because it has achieved efficiencies in production to lower the Model X 75D’s price and “pass along more value to our customers.”

The timing’s certainly interesting. Musk has been hellbent on pursuing an “anti-sell” strategy for the Model 3, the automaker’s more-affordable all-electric sedan that starts at $35,000. And he said that continues to be the marketing plan going forward into the foreseeable future.

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“We’re not promoting the car,” Musk said Wednesday. “If you go to our stores, we don’t even want to talk about it, really, because we want to talk about the thing that we can supply. If somebody orders a Model 3 now, it’s probably late next-year before they get it.”

The Model X endured a number of production mishaps, with delays and rampant quality issues. Musk sounded like things have dramatically improved, and said that the Model X has reached production parity with the Model S.

Along with the Model X price drop, Tesla has standardized more premium options to the fully-loaded versions of the X and Model S. A premium package of options offered by Tesla typically costs $5,000.

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If Tesla’s trying to deter consumers who’re interested in the Model 3, I suppose pricing is one of the easiest places to start.