Photo credit: Austin Fire Department Battalion Chief David Brietzke

You would think after seeing a replica Ferrari 250 GT California fall in the woods in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Ferrari would have developed the latest in car flight technology, but no! A Texan allegedly driving under the influence learned the hard way that his $385,000 Ferrari could not fly after falling down a 40-foot ravine.

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Per the Austin Fire Department’s description, this incredibly expensive single-vehicle crash happened on Red Bud Trail—a hilly, twisty stretch of road that leads to some of Austin’s affluent suburb of Westlake. It’s a fun road if you’re not dumb and/or (allegedly) impaired.

Photo credit: Austin Fire Department Battalion Chief David Brietzke

The Ferrari was traveling at speeds of over 100 mph when it failed to make the first turn after the bridge on Red Bud according to a witness who spoke with the Austin Fire Department. The Ferrari traveled 40 feet in the air before flipping over and dropping into the 40-foot-deep ravine, where it landed facing the direction it was in when it flew off Red Bud Trail, except on its side.

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The Austin Fire Department merely described the car as a limited-production 2015 Ferrari, however, it looks like a 458 to us. The three passengers—that’s right, three people stuffed in a backseat-less Ferrari coupe—miraculously only suffered minor injuries from the fall.

However, 28-year-old driver James Sidney Allen was arrested and charged with driving under the influence, reports KXAN. Allen was at a bar on West Sixth Street prior to the crash, per city records.

So while it’s clear Ferraris are not built to go airborne, they sure seem safe. It’s nothing short of amazing that three people in this two-seat car escaped this stunt with their lives.

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Update: According to one of our readers, the hood and the side winglet in front of the rear wheels indicate that this car is a 458 Speciale. (Super ouch!)

Photo credit: Austin Fire Department Battalion Chief David Brietzke
Photo credit: Austin Fire Department Battalion Chief David Brietzke
Photo credit: Austin Fire Department Battalion Chief David Brietzke

[H/T Eric!]