YouTube/Helgert

What may look like the aftermath of a Lambo owner’s poor parking job is actually a testament to self-expression in a Danish museum. The ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum in Aarhus, Denmark, invited visitors to deface the used Lamborghini as part of its show called “No Man Is An Island - The Satanic Verses.” It’s an apt name. Clearly nothing is sacred.

This piece is painful to look at, but art isn’t created to cater to our comforts. The website for the show says the works on display are supposed to evoke visitors to look at society differently.

“Everything you do, every action, leaves a mark on the society you live in,” it says. “None of us are left untouched, as every little action has an impact on the whole.”

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It’s definitely not bound by reason. The display, entitled ‘Low Key’, went up last September. Visitors to the museum were encourage to scratch whatever came to mind into the black paint. The car quickly filled up with names, haphazard lines and what I can only assume are Danish swear words. One joker even carved ‘Skoda’ on to the side.

The Lambo badging was almost completely demolished and even the windows didn’t escape art-lovers’ wrath. Who knew people who spend hours in quiet museums had so much rage to invest in destruction?

The museum allowed visitors to deface the Gallardo for three weeks before putting a stop to the mayhem. Not that they did it for the car’s benefit, of course. Officials were more worried that too many scratches would leave the car paintless and therefore pointless.

Now that the art piece is ‘complete’ it will continue to be displayed until September. Afterwards, it goes back to Norwegian artist DOLK, who is better know for his street graffiti and is a candidate for the real identity of the elusive Banksy. DOLK has no plans to restore the Gallardo, which makes sense.

Wonderful Engineering noted the car is probably worth more now as a piece of art than when it was just a plain old Lamborghini.