For $7,000, Is This a Fairlane or a Greatlane? ‘60s Week!S

It's all ‘60's all the time this week on Nice Price or Crack Pipe, but that doesn't mean our contenders — like today's '66 Ford Fairlane — can't take advantage of more modern means to their performance ends. That mix of old and new might make this a Ford that goes fast, but will its price make it go likewise?

There are certain styles from the sixties - paisley flared trousers (yes, I said trousers), side-zipped ankle boots, and fondue parties among them - that were rightfully left in that era, One style that 69% of you would gladly transition to our modern age was the Neue Klasse of yesterday's 1967 BMW 2000CS, even at its eighteen grand asking price.

That Teutonic tart showed what Germany's 1960s small-scale production cars were capable of, but what about satisfying the great unwashed masses? What kind of car sated the need for economical family transportation in America's ever growing suburbs where marketing, movie going, or mischief making on lover's lane all required a set of wheels? Well, with over 200,000 produced in 1966 alone, the Ford Fairlane got it done for a lot of folks. Of course, not too many owners back in day likely possessed a Fairlane like this SCAT 347-powered 4-door. but now, thanks to the march of progress, you can.

For $7,000, Is This a Fairlane or a Greatlane? ‘60s Week!S

The Ford Fairlane featured body on frame construction, and with a 116-inch wheelbase was positioned in the Goldilocks zone- bigger than the Falcon but not quite Galaxie class. This one, in deep black over a burgundy vinyl inside, is all about the straight line. Powering the Ford is a massive bored and stroked 302 - punched out to 347-CID - topped by a high-rise intake manifold that would have fixated Roy Neary, and a dual quad Holley setup, all precluding the use of a stock hood.

In fact, the car apparently has no hood whatsoever, providing unfettered viewing access for the big V8, its tower of power intake system, and NOS nitrous oxide piping. That whole ball of max is said to be so new it's not even broken in yet, and is backed by a rebuilt C4 three speed automatic. The ad claims that the suspension has likewise been beefed up, and while not tubbed, the car does sport some serious looking Firestones on Outlaw I wheels.

For $7,000, Is This a Fairlane or a Greatlane? ‘60s Week!S

Aside from the NOS system and the aluminum wheels, this car looks the part of a sixties muscle car. Well, the fact that it's a quattroporte is a bit off, but lends it an air of family friendliness along with the implied ferocity. You could totally imagine a crew-cut and Raybans-sporting owner cruising the streets in it, looking for hippies to suck in the ram scoop and then fart out the tailpipe, infinitely cleaner than before. Thankfully today, the hippies seem to be long gone, but the same act could be undertaken on hipsters, goths, hell anyone whose lifestyle you find personally offensive!

But that'll take some dough-ray-me money, to the tune of $7,000. For that the buyer would be getting a car that the seller says is currently used as a daily driver. Now that may mean he's daily drivin' it to his town's only source of 100 octane, or that his house is 1,320 feet from work, and/or Hooters.

For $7,000, Is This a Fairlane or a Greatlane? ‘60s Week!S

What do you think of that $7,000 price tag for this Fairlane? Obviously there's more than that just sitting in the engine bay, but do you think the rest of the car warranted the investment?

You decide!

Indianapolis Craigslist or go here if the ad disappears.

Help me out with NPOCP. Click here to send a me a fixed-price tip, and remember to include your commenter handle.