How NYC is protecting itself from the "car bomb" terror threat this weekend

Federal officials are currently investigating a potential car bomb plot that Al Qaeda has planned for this weekend, the anniversary of 9/11. The car bomb plot is "credible" but not confirmed and is supposed to target bridges and tunnels.

According to information gathered by intelligence, the FBI are looking for a handful of men (one possibly being a US citizen) who've been ordered by Al Qaeda to blow up a vehicle filled with explosives. The NYPD, as you already know, has built up an impressive Counter Terrorism Unit since 2001 and they will be on full force trying to prevent anything from happening. What does that mean?

It's generally the same methods—police presence, surveillance—but with extra precautions. There'll be expanded vehicle searches, more bomb sniffing dogs, increased police officers on the street, police at subway turnstiles and stations, a constant monitoring of bridge and tunnels and NYPD officers will extend their shifts by four hours through September 12th (at least). Mayor Bloomberg said, according to Bloomberg News:

"We have threats all the time. Each time we increase our security, which obviously we had done for this. Are we increasing a little more? Yes, we're increasing a little more but there's a limit to how much you can have, just because you can't have a cop on every corner. But remember, a lot of the precautions we take, you don't see — undercover and cameras and radiation detectors, using technology and undercover."

Also, the NYPD will use their quasi-navy to help identify any threats. NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly has said that the NYPD has a small unmanned submarine that can check parts of suspicious boats that are submerged. That goes along with radiation detection boats and boats to transport heavy weapon officers. Compared to 2001, the NYPD is more prepared to act and react to terrorism.

Federal officials ask that we continue on with our lives and don't let the terror threat dampen the spirit of our freedom on the 10th anniversary of 9/11. But as they always say, if you see something, say something. [Bloomberg, MSNBC, Andrey Bayda / Shutterstock.com]