Here's How The Ford Mustang Mach-E's Claimed 300-Mile EPA Range Compares To Tesla And Others

Here's How The Ford Mustang Mach-E's Claimed 300-Mile EPA Range Compares To Tesla And Others

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency confirmed the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E’s range estimate of up to 300 miles on a single charge, Ford announced Monday. This makes the electric crossover one of the strongest challengers to other bloated crossover EVs like the Jaguar I-Pace, Audi E-Tron and Tesla Model Y. Here’s how it stacks up.

Reviews Editor, Jalopnik

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Ford Mustang Mach-E

Ford Mustang Mach-E

To ride this pony 300 miles to the next town, you’re going to have to option the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E in the Premium trim with rear-wheel drive and the extended-range battery option. Without those options, the Mach-E will do a little less than 300 miles. To arrive at the Full Monty spec, start with the Premium trim at $48,100 and add the larger, 98.8 kWh battery pack which tacks another $5,000 on top, totaling $53,100 for the chance to squeeze out every mile the EPA says you can get.

Adding all-wheel drive is an additional $2,700, and reduces the estimated EPA range of the Mach-E Premium with the extended-range battery to 270 miles — so you pay more for less range (and go a tad quicker to 60 mph, if it matters!) The standard 75.5 kWh Premium trim battery pack will go an estimated 211 miles with all-wheel drive, or 230 miles without it. Mach-E buyers still qualify for the full $7,500 U.S. federal tax credit, along with local and state incentives.

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Jaguar I-Pace

Jaguar I-Pace

Jaguar I-Pace
Jaguar I-Pace
Image: JW / Jalopnik

I can’t stop looking at just how similar the I-Pace and Mach-E designs appear. Ford really needs to let Jaguar go, not just in its portfolio but also in its heart. It’s been forever. Anyway, the Jaguar I-Pace may only be capable of a max estimated range of 234 miles on a charge, but remember, it’s also older and, at $69,850, way more expensive than the new Ford, too. (It also gets the full $7,500 federal tax incentive, but it won’t help much here.)

While I may personally think the I-Pace is one of the cooler, more surprising EVs to crop up and seemingly not go very far, I can’t dispute that in the three or so years it’s been on the market, the Jag’s interior, technology packaging and performance have all been improved upon by the Ford. Being a Jag, it does have some character, and I wouldn’t put money down for any one of these until I at least took the I-Pace for a test drive.

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Audi E-Tron

Audi E-Tron

Audi E-Tron
Audi E-Tron
Image: Audi

There is a strong argument that range in electric vehicles simply does not matter as much as we seem to want it to. Most commutes do not require a car with more than 100-miles or so tucked in its electric juice pack. However, I don’t think that argument matters to most people. We are not rational beings and big numbers look better, but for those who may care a little less, maybe the Audi E-Tron is an answer

The E-Tron Premium trim starts at $65,900, includes all-wheel drive and will go up to 222 miles on a charge. Audi’s pitch here over the cheaper, rear-wheel-drive Mach-E could be horsepower. The Audi offers 355 horsepower, or up to 402 HP in “Boost Mode,” compared to the Mach-E Premium rear-wheel drive’s estimated 282 HP. The Mach-E Premium with all-wheel drive only goes up to 332 HP.

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Mercedes-Benz EQC

Mercedes-Benz EQC

Mercedes-Benz EQC
Mercedes-Benz EQC
Image: Mercedes-Benz

While it isn’t great that the Mercedes-Benz EQC was delayed pretty much a full year after already having reportedly suffered battery production issues, the Germans still promise the big electric car is coming to America soon. Like the Audi, the Mercedes gets an estimated near-200 mile range but they’re also going to throw a lot of power at it.

If you want to whoop the Mach-E, I-Pace and E-Tron (enough with those names, yikes), the Mercedes-Benz EQC could be one of the tools to do so. Mercedes claims its two electric motors can produce up to 402 HP (without a “Boost Mode,” Audi) and 564 lb-ft of torque. You’ll just have to pay up for the power because the EQC starts at $67,900 before tax credits are factored in. And then Mercedes also has to actually sell it to you, whenever it gets around to it.

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Volkswagen ID.4

Volkswagen ID.4

VW ID.4
VW ID.4
Image: VW

On the much more affordable end of the spectrum is the new VW ID.4, which also suffered delays and is scheduled to be delivered to customers in the U.S. in March. The ID.4 range tops out at 250 miles of range at a price of $39,995, before the full suite of federal and possibly state tax credits. It’s by far the cheapest choice.

Compared to the Mach-E and E-Tron, the ID.4's humble 201 horsepower output is also a firm reminder of just how much of the money invested in EVs goes into the battery tech, and the strict relationship between money going in and how much fun comes out. But VW claims the ID.4 still “drives like a GTI,” and an all-wheel-drive version with potentially more power will be available after production begins next year. Either way, the ID.4 as a concept feels like a total tonic to folks shopping in the lower Mach-E range. While I’d encourage rational thinking with money involved, biasing me toward the VW, the Mach-E just seems so much more interesting, and I don’t even find it that interesting to begin with.

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Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y
Tesla Model Y
Image: Tesla

The Tesla Model Y is the most practical Tesla to live with, and probably only marginally off from being just as good to drive for a thrill as it’s smaller sibling, the Tesla Model 3. On top of that, it certainly offers more features and performance than any other electric crossover on the market.

If you want to cross-shop the 300-mile range, rear-wheel drive Mach-E, the Model Y compares better than just about anything else. The Long Range model starts at $49,990, but since Tesla has exhausted its federal tax credits by exceeding a certain volume of sales, you won’t be getting that $7500 “price cut” you might get on these other cars—though local incentives may still be available. The Long Range gets an estimated 326 miles of range and produces 384 HP.

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Car buying is more passion than process, which is why I included the Jaguar I-Pace. (I know you’re still wondering why it’s here, so I’m explaining it again.) Looking at this list rationally, the only true competitors are the Mustang Mach-E and the Tesla Model Y. Both seem to answer the same questions of price, performance, capability and branding seemingly asked by a large share of folks with a budget for a $50,000 electric car.

The Model Y is priced at $49,990 with no federal incentives, but it is also the most “popular” and recognizable car of the group. Its 384 HP and 326 miles of range outshines the Mach-E’s 282 HP and 300 miles. After the $7,500 tax credit, the Mach-E carries a price of $45,600. Is the difference enough to sell you on the Ford? Does the fact that it’s built by a legacy automaker not constantly dogged by reports of service nightmares help in the buying process? Which EV crossover would you have?

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Reviews Editor, Jalopnik

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