At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?

Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?
Photo: Craigslist
Nice Price Or No DiceIs this used car a good deal? You decide!

A six-speed stick is what makes today’s Nice Price or Crack Pipe Crossfire a fairly noteworthy contender. Let’s see if this literal Daimler-Chrysler car’s asking price makes it even more so.

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Aside from its tidy presentation, I think one of the most refreshing aspects of yesterday’s 1995 Nissan 240SX was its two-door coupé body. These days carmakers are throwing lowered or fastback rooflines on four-door cars and anointing the result a “coupé.” This was a practice that was started all the way back in the mid-sixties by Britain’s Rover, and I still don’t approve of it.

Many of you also didn’t approve of that Nissan’s $7,500 asking price. Traditional and nice as the car was, that was considered too high by 55 percent of you, leaving it with a Crack Pipe loss.

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Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?

There’s this old joke amongst car industry nerds that goes: How do you pronounce Daimler-Chrysler in German? You pronounce it Daimler, the Chrysler is silent. I know, right?!

This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire is kind of the opposite of that bon mot. That’s because its flamboyant styling speaks volumes about what Chrysler was peddling a decade or so back while it rides on an almost hidden Mercedes Benz SLK platform.

Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?
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I think this model also represents the first time in history that a model has shared its name with a fuel injection set up on a competing brand. That precursor was Chevy’s L83 V8, an engine that featured a pair of throttle body injectors and gave Corvette fans something to cheer about back in the early ‘80s.

Speaking of ‘80s, doesn’t this Chrysler look like it’s more than just 15 years old? I don’t mean that it looks beat up—we’ll get to its condition in a minute—I mean its styling just looks… older than that. Maybe it’s the retro cues? The ribbed hood and bustled back were obvious stylistic talismans to an earlier era. It’s questionable just how well they’ve aged.

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Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?

The platform under that styling is of another era as well. Chrysler based the Crossfire on the Mercedes SLK, only they didn’t choose the contemporary edition but the earlier R170 model. That car had ended its production run at the same time the Crossfire began its.

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This one, in Graphite Metallic over a grey cloth interior sports the standard but rare six-speed manual gearbox. That’s mated to a 3.2-litre M112 V6 engine and sends power to the rear wheels via a multi-link IRS setup. The SOHC six offered 215 horsepower from the factory and with just a little over 109,000 miles on the clock, this one should have most of those still in residence.

Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?
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Styling aside, this Crossfire has a couple of aesthetic issues. The nose is a bit peppery and the brightwork on the windshield trim—a trademark styling element—has been painted black. I guess a few cars came like that so we shouldn’t necessarily call that latter element out.

The interior shows a bit of use as well. The seats, dash, and door cards all look to be in decent shape, but there is some scuffing on the side of the tall center tunnel, and, oddly enough, a sizable crack running through the plastic of the instrument cluster cover. I’m really not sure how that could have even happened.

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Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?

An interesting—and annoying—feature of the Crossfire is the asymmetrical wheel size, front to back. With factory wheels, these cars run 18-inch wheels up front and 19-inch rollers back where the action happens. That means your typical tire rotation is either a no-go or the impetus for a hilarious Top Gear segment.

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It also means your tires are going to wear out faster than you might ordinarily expect.

Okay, enough of the Crossfire bashing for today.

On the plus side here, the car comes with an aftermarket stereo head unit bringing it up to modern convenience specs with fancy pants Bluetooth connectivity. It also has a car cover in the boot that features a handy storage bag so as not to take up all of the space under the hatch. A “Crossfire” rear license plate frame rounds out the obvious aftermarket additions.

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Illustration for article titled At $4,995, Would You Cross Paths With This 2005 Chrysler Crossfire?

The title is clean and the seller does describe the car as “Nice.” You won’t get much more than that out of the ad other than the fact that the car drove the Tail of the Dragon (318 curves in 11 miles!) back in 2013.

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The asking price is $4,995, and you now need to weigh in on how well the seller has done in assigning that value. What do you think, is this Crossfire worth that $4,995 as presented in its ad? Or, is that price only set to cross you up?

You decide!

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Atlanta, GA Craigslist, or go here if the ad disappears.

H/T to Lamar G. for the hookup!

Help me out with NPOCP. Hit me up at rob@jalopnik.com and send me a fixed-price tip. Remember to include your Kinja handle.

Rob Emslie is a contributing writer for Jalopnik. He has too many cars, and not enough time to work on them all.

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DISCUSSION

outmotorsports
Jake Thiewes

My mom’s got one of these in droptop form, that she bought new. Six-speed, she wanted the 100 extra horsepower you got from the SRT-6 (aka, 32AMG) but said “no way” to the automatic.

This car has NOT had the windshield header repainted. It’s a “base” trim, as opposed to the more common Limited that has the silver windshield header. Base Crossfires got black cloth seats that may not have been heated, I think fewer speakers, and some other goofy changes to reduce entry-level cost somehow.

The manual is fine, totally fine, not great at all. Do not expect Miata or BMW levels of shift action here. The manual is shared with the same-year Jeep Wrangler (really) and it feels like 1st gear is mostly for rock crawling. Clutch action is fine but shift throw is notchy and the whole drivetrain is really better suited to an automatic, I think. Still, not bad.

The car itself is also fine, absolutely a cruiser and not really a sports car to me. It is 100% SLK except the body (built by Karmann) and software running on the ECU/other modules (that’s Chrysler, even though the boxes are MB parts).

They are fairly reliable, though owners should source a “DRB III” scan tool and hang on to it. Many Chrysler dealerships don’t have those tools anymore and you need one to talk to the car’s computers for most anything beyond a simple OBD II code scan. These scan tools were hot shit in the 1990s for like, the Dodge Stratus. Mercedes dealers can work on the cars (and truthfully, are better suited than any Chrysler shop) but cannot do anything related to software. At all.

I’d throw it a cautious NP.

I gotta do a write-up/video on mom’s car for Out Motorsports. Moving that to the top of my list.