This Is What The Porsche Taycan Looks Like With Almost No Camouflage

Illustration for article titled This Is What The Porsche Taycan Looks Like With Almost No Camouflage

The Porsche Taycan is one of the most anticipated electric cars, a long-range EV that meshes Porsche’s premium branding with serious electric performance. Now, thanks to a Jalopnik reader in Virginia, we have a better idea of what it’ll look like.

Advertisement

Akbar spotted the Taycan roaming the streets of Tyson’s Corner, a Virginia suburb near Volkswagen’s corporate headquarters in Herdon. Akbar was cruising in his 1961 Lincoln, a 7.0-liter V8 behemoth that couldn’t be further from the Taycan.

Porsche has said that the Taycan should reach 60 in under 3.5 seconds and be good for 310 miles of electric range. The company also expects the Taycan to outsell the 911.

Advertisement

Stripped of most of its camo, the Taycan looks sleek. It’s still fitted with some things we don’t expect to see in the production car, like fake exhaust tips. Those look tacked on to hide the Taycan’s all-electric identity from spy photographers.

The car should be officially unveiled at the Frankfurt Auto Show in September. Porsche already has 30,000 pre-orders.

Illustration for article titled This Is What The Porsche Taycan Looks Like With Almost No Camouflage
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled This Is What The Porsche Taycan Looks Like With Almost No Camouflage
Illustration for article titled This Is What The Porsche Taycan Looks Like With Almost No Camouflage

Mack Hogan is Jalopnik's Weekend Editor, but you may know him from his role as CNBC's car critic or his brave (and maligned) takes on Twitter. Most people agree that you shouldn't listen to him.

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

BiPolarWithCars
BiPolarWithCars

This is going to take the top end of the EV market from Tesla, no ifs, ands, or buts. Porsche can actually put a $100,000 interior in a $100,000 car and the differences in overall build quality will be laughable.

Once the Japanese commit to EVs at the bottom of the market, Tesla will be finished without partnering up with an existing manufacturer. Tesla clearly leads the industry in EV drivetrains and battery tech, but they are far behind in the thousands of parts that make up the rest of a car, and of course the actual building of the vehicles.