Image: Gran Turismo Sport

We don’t know much about the new Toyota Supra, since the racing version of it debuted in March with a funky livery and approximately zero performance stats. Will it make 50 horsepower or 500? Who knows! But with its Gran Turismo Sport debut, we at least know that the virtual version will be powered by 591 horses.

The Supra’s racing concept got uploaded into the game with a free update on Friday, nearly two months after it showed up for the first time at the Geneva Motor Show and nearly two decades since the beloved production tuner car got killed off by Toyota. The difference between a car sitting at an auto show and a car in a game, though, is that the latter needs performance numbers behind it.

Image: Gran Turismo Sport

Gran Turismo Sport announced that the car was officially in the game on Friday, yet didn’t mention any details on its performance. Sounds familiar. But when you’re driving a car on a simulator that’s meant to simulate real racing, there has to be some kind of information on what exactly you’re driving.

New YouTube videos show the Supra concept’s overview screen in the game, which lists it at 591 brake horsepower at 6,800 RPM and 514 lb-ft of torque at 6,000 RPM. The car is also listed at 1,243 kilograms, or 2,740 pounds. All of the other stat boxes—displacement, length, width and height—have no numbers.

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Screenshot: MotoGamesTV (YouTube), WorldonWire Playstation VR (YouTube)

Those numbers definitely shouldn’t be taken as an indication of what the street car will have, since even Gran Turismo’s announcement said the racing concept’s “performance surpasses anything [Gran Turismo] had been anticipating about a possible revived Supra.”

A Supra from the factory hovered around 300 HP before it disappeared from production, so these numbers are definitely more indicative of what to expect from the race car than from the street version. The same is the case for the car’s interior in the game, of course.

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Image: Gran Turismo Sport

But these are the first numbers we’ve gotten amongst a sea of speculation that the Supra will cost a ton, won’t get a manual option and that the production version won’t come around until 2019. So, really, they’re better than nothing, which is all we’ve gotten so far.

And while it’s hard to stay excited for a car you know virtually nothing about, maybe driving its racing version on a simulator will help.