New Haynes Manuals Will No Longer Be In Print

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If you’ve done any serious car fixes, chances are you’ve picked up a repair guide like a Haynes Repair Manual. You can find Haynes manuals for a multitude of cars, even manuals for fictional vehicles like the USS Enterprise from Star Trek. But in an increasingly digital age, Haynes is closing up its print shop.

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While the company will no longer create new manuals in print, it has a giant back catalog of existing manuals to work through. So you’ll still be able to get print manuals for many vehicles.

Haynes clarified this decision on Twitter:

It’s not the end of the road for Haynes – we are embarking on an exciting new journey! Contrary to reports, Haynes is not stopping printing Manuals. Whilst we will no longer publish new print Workshop Manuals, we will continue to print and publish our huge back catalogue.

As for the future of Haynes? It’s going digital with the goal of covering even more cars, via Twitter:

Embracing John Haynes’ philosophy, we are currently in the process of creating a new automotive maintenance and repair product that covers around 95% of car makes and models – an increase of around 40% over our current Workshop Manual coverage.

This will provide you, our loyal enthusiasts, with a greater choice than ever before and we will reveal more in due course. Far from being the end of the road, we are ensuring that Haynes will continue well into the 21st century.

John Haynes started J. H. Haynes & Co. in 1960 and hit the ground running, publishing illustrated teardowns of cars. Haynes died in February 2019; the company was purchased by Infopro Digital a couple of months later. One of Infopro’s solutions for the auto aftermarket industry is to digitize business functions.

When I work on my various vehicles, my phone is one of my most valuable tools. Sadly, Haynes never did make a manual for the Smart Fortwo. As far as I’m concerned, car wrenchers may have greater coverage, and having it all digital makes it easier to use than lugging around a thick book. So maybe it’ll be a win overall.

DISCUSSION

By
NoahthePorscheGuy

Sure a phone is good for quick stuff, but when my hands get disgusting and I spend all day on the car I would 100% rather have a paper book to turn through. My phone’s battery is shit and pulling it out when working on a car over a long period of time is a recipe for the phone to get nasty and probably dropped. I don't want to have to buy a shit tablet to be able to read a manual full sized, not to mention the best part of buying an old car is seeing that somebody hand wrote notes on different pages of the Haynes manual