Good Thing I Didn't See This Hellcat-Swapped Miata Before It Sold, Or I Would've Been $36,000 Poorer

If there are two things in life that I find to be inarguable blessings to this Earth, aside from emissions and such, they are the Mazda Miata and any motor vehicle with “Hellcat” in its name. Thus, similar to a department-store blowout jewelry sale where I may or may not lose control and hide everything I bought from my husband in various corners of the house, I am blessed to have missed the memo on the auction of this Hellcat-powered Miata until after it sold.

That would’ve been a hard purchase to hide, you know? I’d have to double check, but I don’t think it would fit under the bed.

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The modded Miata is called the “Hell Kitty,” which is also what my mother happens to call her cats, in addition to the occasional “shit head” and “Sir Poops a Lot.” It’s a second-generation 1999 model, with its original engine swapped out for the 707-horsepower, 6.2-liter supercharged V8 that Dodge puts in its performance cars, mated to a six-speed manual transmission.

It was at Barrett-Jackson in Las Vegas this week, and sold for a full $36,300 compared to the $20,000 MSRP of the Hellcat crate engine on its own.

Aside from the sheer size and weight of the engine in such a tiny roadster, which makes a Hellcat Miata such a fascinating thing is how much of a rocket missile it is. The difference between the Miata and the Dodge vehicles that usually get these engines is that while the Charger and Challenger Hellcats hover around the gargantuan 4,500-pound mark, the 1999 Miata is more like 2,300 pounds stock.

All of the power and nearly half of the weight means, basically, a lot of fun—$36,300 worth of fun, for the person who drove it away.

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But I’m just happy I missed the window, or else I’d be down five figures and up in marital anxiety. At least my husband hasn’t found all of that jewelry I bought last week—yet.

(H/t to Motor Trend)

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Alanis King

Alanis King is a staff writer at Jalopnik.