Elon Musk Says 100 Gigafactories Is 'Manageable'

Illustration for article titled Elon Musk Says 100 Gigafactories Is 'Manageable'

Leonardo DiCaprio visits Elon Musk. One says something about saving the planet, and the other agrees.

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Leonardo DiCaprio took a tour of Tesla’s giant Nevada battery factory alongside Elon Musk as a segment in a documentary about the dangers of climate change that DiCaprio is doing called Before the Flood.

The duo discuss how the $5 billion dollar battery factory is critical to the future of sustainable energy.

Leonardo DiCaprio asks a very considerate question about how a giant battery factory built by an automaker in Nevada will help “developing nations that have massive populations that need to have power.”

Musk’s answer is that, with his batteries, they won’t need to bother with building power plants, like when some nations skipped landline phones and “went straight to cellular.”

Tesla did the math, and to transfer the whole world to sustainable energy, it would only take 100 gigafactories (at $5 billion or so each) to work. So, we just invest $500 billion in giant battery factories, build no new power plants despite the growing energy demand, and developing nations have nothing to worry about?

You can watch DiCaprio’s full film Before The Flood on YouTube right now.

Via Automobile Magazine

Reviews Editor, Jalopnik

DISCUSSION

So, we just invest $500 billion in giant battery factories, build no new power plants despite the growing energy demand, and developing nations have nothing to worry about?

Well no, but take Tesla and Musk out of the equation - since people get insta-skeptical whenever his name is attached to something.

There’s a very real benefit to being able to essentially generate your own home (and vehicle) power source, and not have to devote resources to maintaining a powerplant and the infrastructure necessary to deliver power over less-than-ideal climates (and having all of that shit controlled by a corrupt government). It’s not something we think about since the majority of us live in a first world country, but the number of things we’re able to do by virtue of never once having to really worry about our electricity getting cut off (short of a natural disaster) is astounding.