Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof

Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof

In Quentin Tarantino’s "Death Proof", Kurt Russells’s character modifies his car to protect its driver in even the most severe of accidents, thus rendering the machine impervious to death. Bespoke Ventures has done exactly the opposite, modifying their Nissan GT-R in such a way that severe back injury is virtually guaranteed by any front-end collision. Click through to find out why.

Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
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Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
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Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
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Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
Illustration for article titled Bulletproof GT-RR Not Death Proof
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Check out the way the harnesses are mounted. By attaching the shoulder belts to a point lower than the shoulders, the driver and passenger’s spines will be compressed in the event of the car running into something. This will crush the vertebrae and could even lead to paralysis in extreme cases. Other modifications include tastelessly applied decals, plus the usual assortment of big wings, big wheels, lowered suspension and fancy brakes. We’re not sure what’s going on inside the GT-RR’s engine bay, but judging by Bespoke Venture’s online selection of engine upgrades, it’s probably plenty.

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DISCUSSION

Attaching the harnesses to the rear seatbelt mounting points is actually recommended by Schroth, among other harness manufacturers, though that particular angle does make me uncomfortable. At least they're not running them straight down to the rear bolts for the seat rails like some soon-to-be paraplegic ricers do.