Image: Matt Cardy (Getty Images), Porsche

Why, hello, you there, do you happen to have a 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS? Of course you don’t! But if you did, this guy would trade you a big chunk of his waterfront property in Florida for it. Maybe next time.

Don’t get your feelings hurt. That “maybe next time” part wasn’t snubbing you completely; this offer to trade wheels for island property actually happens once every few years. The latest offer is for the new GT2 RS, a 700-horsepower track machine that starts at $293,000 and can lap the Nürburgring five seconds faster than a Lamborghini Huracan Performante. (In the version of English commonly spoken by people outside of the car realm, that means it’s fast.)

But only a select few get in on cars like this, and reports were that all 1,000 units of the GT2 RS were sold out before Porsche would even acknowledge that it existed. A landowner in Florida missed out just like the rest of us, and posted a Craigslist ad recently offering a piece of island property in exchange for one.

This isn’t the first time this particular landowner has offered up a chunk of his Florida island space to trade it for an expensive, low-volume car he missed out on, and it’s not some kind of joke—Jalopnik reached out to the owner, identified as Emilio by The Drive, who sent us proof of ownership through his land trust. He’s also tried to trade his island property for a Porsche 918 and a Ferrari Enzo, but didn’t tell Jalopnik whether he’d ever successfully made a trade like this.

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The newest property for trade is on Realtor.com for $555,000, meaning, if that’s market value, this would fall somewhere between a good deal and a really good deal for a GT2 RS owner—depending on its specs and how high they drove the price. But when a person has the cash for a GT2 RS, for which there’s far more demand than supply, striking a deal probably isn’t super high on the list.

Anyway, if you happen to find yourself in possession of a GT2 RS anytime soon, you could stand to get a decent deal on your own island space in Florida—you know, so long as that island space is above the sea level and such.