Image: Iron Horse Auction

It’s a fundamental fact of life that with the appropriate amount of extra cash on hand, the only logical thing to do is go out and buy a hardcore professional race car—whether the plan is to make that race car street legal, take it to the track, or simply display it as rolling shell in the entryway of your home.

Isn’t that what all wealthy people do? No? Whatever; they should.

For anyone who’s yet to take advantage of that fundamental fact, though, the Winston-Salem Journal spotted a good opportunity coming up: a huge auction of old NASCAR race cars, trailers and equipment in March. Some race cars still have their guts, others are rolling shells; some trailers come with big screens, others with kitchen areas and meeting spaces.

The auction will happen online and in person in Lexington, North Carolina, and items are from a company called JKS Incorporated, according to the video below and the Journal. The Iron Horse Auction Company is hosting it all, and its website said some of the items up for grabs include trailers with 30-foot jumbo screens, trailers without screens,
pickups, SUVs, golf carts and, of course, race cars

The NASCAR car offerings are pretty good, too, like rolling chassis and shells, cutaway cars used to show the inner mechanical workings on broadcasts and at events, show cars, and cars with motors. Some of the more notable ones include the car from Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s Mountain Dew duck-call commercial and the car Jeff Burton won the pole with for the 2006 Daytona 500.

In writing about the auction, the Journal summed up JKS’ history as such:

JKS, based at 301 Welcome Center Driver, is owned by Will Spencer, who operates the Winston Cup Museum Special Event Center in downtown Winston-Salem.

The Winston Cup Museum opened in May 2005 with nearly 12,000 feet of exhibit space as a memorial to the Winston Cup era of NASCAR racing (1971-2003). It’s located on a one-acre tract at 1355 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive.

Spencer moved his JKS operations to Lexington in 2007. The museum quietly stayed open until December 2014 when Spencer decided to halt operations. Attendance had dropped 65 percent over a five-year span, and he felt a new direction was needed.

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The Journal wrote that the museum opened back up in 2015 as the Winston Cup Museum Special Event Center, with a focus on event hosting,  and that Spencer said in a statement that the goal in auctioning things off is to “make room for [the center’s] continued growth and operations.” 

Meanwhile, it’s about time anyone with the extra cash starts making room for frivolous race-car purchases—whether that space be carved out in the living room or in the garage. Your couch was starting to look a little worn, anyway.