Getting tired or frustrated with the car you own is one of the most dangerous and potentially devastating realizations a person can come to. Like all of life’s struggles, it may help to talk through it.

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Yesterday afternoon I went to a new barber. I had just flown in from North Carolina where I visited family and friends for Mother’s Day and college graduation, and I wanted a quick cut before flying out to Austin to drive the new 2019 Hyundai Veloster.

Me and the barber had the usual chat about what I do for a living, and when he learned I write about cars, he opened up to me. My new barber, and someone I hope I can now call my friend, opened up to me about how he had become lethargic toward his ownership of a Lexus IS F.

The IS F is a good car, he admitted, but he’s owned it for a couple of years and he’s beginning to feel restless with the itch for a new car. He’s thinking about getting the new BMW 5 Series. And no, not an M5. I asked him that.

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From what he was hinting at, I think, to his mind, owning a BMW would grant him the image he wishes to project, possibly because it’s a more recognizable badge of luxury, and perhaps success, when compared to a Lexus. Again, to him, and I’m inferring.

Then we got into the typical conversation about how leasing could potentially be a more attractive option for someone who can make the payments for a new car, and who is fully aware and accepting they have a tendency to grow weary over long-term car commitments.

But anyway, the conversation got me thinking about what sort of circumstances drive both the enthusiast and the average person to begin to look for a new or different car.

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What did it for you? Was it too much maintenance? Did you not have enough time to drive the car like you imagined? Did your dream car end up disappointing you once you finally managed to procure it? Talk it out. We can get through this provoking ennui together.