The Ford F-150's Longstanding Name In Mexico Haunts Me (Update: Details From Ford)

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What do you call a Ford F-150 in Español? Is it just a Ford F-150 said aloud in Spanish, with its emphatic “f” sound? EFF-150? Actually, no. It’s called a Lobo.

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You see, Ford Mexico did this bizarre thing in the ‘90s, according to a couple of reports, where it took the alphanumeric nameplate of the F-150 and changed it to a name, to Lobo, which means wolf. And I’ve always wondered about it, stayed up late even. Like why, Ford, why? It’s all marketing, of course. But I guess I’m a level seven susceptible because I want that Lobo Platinum very much.

Illustration for article titled The Ford F-150's Longstanding Name In Mexico Haunts Me (Update: Details From Ford)
Screenshot: Ford

Still, it vexes me. It’s not the animal itself I wondered about or that this Ford even had a different name south of the border. A lot of cars are rebadged in markets abroad. And I suppose that when I first noticed this on a 10th-generation F-Series in Mexico, the name kinda made sense.

The rounded but athletic proportions of that generation F-150 reminded a little of a wolf. OK, maybe that gen reminds me more of a killer whale, or orca, but that tracks! Killer whales are the wolves of the sea.

The name didn’t bother me, then. In fact, I dug it then and dig it now. I see the trucks often with their Mexican plates and their LOBO badges. It’s pretty rad. As a kid, I begged my dad to take us to a junkyard in Mexico so we could get a Lobo badge (in all caps, by the way) and stick it on our family car, a maroon 1997 U.S.-spec F-150 — but we never got that Lobo badge.

Illustration for article titled The Ford F-150's Longstanding Name In Mexico Haunts Me (Update: Details From Ford)
Photo: Ford
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All Ford had to do was leave the nameplate alone. For the most part, numbers are recognizable across languages. Ford could have saved money. It could have saved time. It could have saved the tooling process and labor. Instead, it gave its pickup a little mustard and changed its number to a name.

Illustration for article titled The Ford F-150's Longstanding Name In Mexico Haunts Me (Update: Details From Ford)
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Illustration for article titled The Ford F-150's Longstanding Name In Mexico Haunts Me (Update: Details From Ford)
Photo: Getty (Getty Images)
Illustration for article titled The Ford F-150's Longstanding Name In Mexico Haunts Me (Update: Details From Ford)
Photo: Getty (Getty Images)
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It doesn’t always work favorably. I noticed by poking around on Ford Mexico that the name distinguishes specs. Anything above and including the XLT is a Lobo, while the basic trims are still just F-150s. Special edition pickups such as the Raptor or Tremor also bear the name, so Mexico gets a Lobo Raptor and a Lobo Tremor. A Wolf Raptor and Wolf Tremor? Sorry, but that just sucks. Ford, stop.

The Lobo is a Lobo is a Lobo. Let its cool-but-unnecessary name be. And, maybe bring it to the U.S.-spec trucks, too. That’s one car dream I’ve yet to satisfy. I’ve reached out to Ford, asking about this wondrous rebadge and will update If I hear back.

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UPDATE [Friday, March 19, 2021, 01:56 PM ET]:

A spokesperson for Ford replied to my request for comment and they shared the following:

Ford started using the LOBO name/badge in 1997 as a way to further differentiate between work trucks and personal use trucks for our customers in Mexico.

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It makes sense that work trucks kept the alphanumeric badge and personal trucks got the cool name. This also verifies the story about the rebadge dating back to the ‘90s and it even matches the year of our beloved family car, the maroon ‘97 F-150. 

The question remains whether or not the rebadge applied to the last of the ninth-generation trucks. Ford phased those out gradually as the 10th-generation came to market, so it’s possible some much older, grizzled Lobos are rolling around in Mexico.

Staff Writer at Jalopnik. Periodista automotriz, Naturally Aspirated Stan.

DISCUSSION

mikaelvroom
MikaelVroom

A Wolf Raptor and Wolf Tremor?

Yeah, that’s about as crazy as naming a car a Horse Snake. Right?

Also, I only recently discovered that while Ford discontinued the Lincoln Mark LT pickup in the US after the 2008 model year in favor of the new Platinum trim F-150, the Mark LT was so popular in Mexico that Ford kept the nameplate going with this abomination:

The instrument cluster in my 2011 F-150 actually has the option to show the Lincoln splash screen if I so pleased.