Stolen Porsche Development Center Engines Found At TechArt Garage?

This image was lost some time after publication.
This image was lost some time after publication.

We saw this earlier on Final Gear and were hoping a news outlet would have some more info for us to go on, but since we can't find anything else to go on, here's what they're saying:

"3 Engine prototypes have been stolen out of Porsches development center, 2 conventional engines and one "engine of the future". The parts have been found in the Techart garage. four people are in jail, two leasing-managers of porsche, and two customers. Porsche now sues Techart for theft, Techart says they bought the stuff with a bill and thought everything was ok, but found out, that the engine wasn´t the promised 997 Turbo engine, but something else (they were fascinated), so they gave it back to the dealer, and it was found there. If it´s true, Techart will be out of the buisness, because Porsche never delivers parts to someone who did something "strange" with them....Right now, the only facts are, the engines disappeared, popped up at Techart......that´s it."

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Anyone able to read German and figure out heads or tails of this — let us know, because we're just plain confused.

Top secret next generation Porsche engines stolen & found at Techart [Final Gear]

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DISCUSSION

Looks like two Porsche employees and two customers have admitted to a conspiracy to steal these engines. Their motive appears to have been financial. The thieves had been caught red-handed while delivering the stolen parts to a mechanic near Boeblingen. The parts had been reported stolen in late April.

That mechanic is well known for buying high-performance parts and installing them in vehicles for customers. In this case, however, they ended up at TechArt, who claim to have received them in error in response to a legitimate order. They also claim they returned all of them to the mechanic once they discovered their order had not been fulfilled correctly. The engines were never assembled at Techart nor fitted into any vehicle there.

However, the article does not state how much time passed between this discovery and the when the parts were eventually returned. Nor does it state if Techart made any attempt to document them in any way for e.g. illegal copies or reverse engineering purposes.

The local DA currently considers the case an instance of conspiracy, theft and dealing in stolen goods but not one of industrial espionage.