Illustration for article titled Russians Assemble A Car Inside A Tiny Room And Then Try Extracting It Through A Window

To get an old Lada wagon into a small room in a house, a group of zany Russian “scientists” chopped the car to pieces. Watch them weld it back together, get it running, attempt a burnout in the room, and then try to extract the vehicle from the house through a small window. It’s absolutely absurd.

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It’s Friday, and many of you are preparing for the Memorial Day Weekend (which may or may not entail any exciting plans, given Covid). If you’re lucky enough to still have a job, there’s a chance you’re coasting right now, looking for something to help waste away the remaining hours of this workday so you can enjoy a three day party with your Netflix account and your pajamas.

That something is this video from the YouTubers at Garage 54—possibly the most idiotic (and perhaps also brilliant, I’m unsure at this point) automotive footage ever recorded by humankind:

The title, “Royall f...ked: extracting a car through a window” doesn’t do the clip justice. That’s because, not only does the team try to literally pull a vehicle through a window that is much, much smaller than the Lada, but the crew actually got the car into the house in the first place by chopping it into bits, and then welding it back together in a room whose length appears to be maybe a foot or two greater than the distance from the Lada’s rear bumper to its front bumper.

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Once the Garage 54 guys have the car pieced together, they fire up the motor and attempt a burnout in the little room. I say “attempt,” because the result is quite pathetic, as there’s just not enough torque at the wheels to spin up the tires on the hardwood floor.

From there, the team hooks a cable up to the car and tries pulling it through a window using a tractor. Since the car is so much bigger than the window, the car takes out the whole wall, and collapses the house’s roof.

Again, the whole thing is absurd, but that’s what makes it worth sharing.

Sr. Technical Editor, Jalopnik. Always interested in hearing from auto engineers—email me. Cars: Willys CJ-2A ('48), Jeep J10 ('85), Jeep Cherokee ('79, '91, '92, '00), Jeep Grand Cherokee 5spd ('94).

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