Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

Leaning Tower Of Power Gets Blown For $400

Illustration for article titled Leaning Tower Of Power Gets Blown For $400

The Mopar Slant Six is one of the undisputed marvels of the engineering world; when the Sun goes supernova and the entire planet has been reduced to ionized hydrogen, a '67 Valiant will still be chugging along in the debris field (I once saw a Slant Six that had been completely filled with water- due to the owner's confusion about which cap to remove in order to add coolant- and had driven that way for weeks; the unpleasant noises and brown foam spewing out the tailpipe were apparently not regarded as meaningful). So it goes without saying that you can turbocharge the living hell out of one with no ill effects. Here's a nice article by a guy who put together a blown Dart for $400 with all-junkyard parts and a fair helping of ingenuity; sure, he's only running low 16s now, but that's probably about four seconds better than stock.

Advertisement

$400 Slant Six Turbo Setup [Slantsix.org]

Related:
If Slant 6 Were 9: A Mopar-Powered Bug Rod [internal]

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

MarionCobretti
MarionCobretti

Wow, nice article, Cobretti. Since I'm seriously considering building an all-junkyard Megasquirted/turbocharged inline 6 (GMC 292, maybe?) in the near future, I need all the pointers I can get.

That sounds stark raving mad. In other words, two thumbs up!

And damn straight, Seth- the Slant Six may indeed be the best engine ever made...

Oh, and not to give short shrift to Chrysler, but if the Slant Six had been built as designed, it probably wouldn't have been the best engine ever. It was intended to be cast in aluminum, and the block was designed accordingly. When Chrysler couldn't make that work, they said "Ah, fuck it, let's just build it out of iron," but used the same design, meaning the block was way stronger than it needed to be. Chrysler is actually quite fortunate they couldn't figure out how to mass produce an aluminum motor in the late 50's-early 60's, or else the Six mightn't have been so legendarily unbreakable.