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If I Had $140,000 I Might Actually Spend It On Ralph Gilles' Dodge Demon

I know a good deal when I see one, and $140,000 for a used Dodge ain’t it. But I also recognize a Demon when I see one–because it gives me flashbacks to the mind-melting moments I spent behind the wheel, full-noise, on a drag strip in Indiana. This is a historically significant car, and this one, in particular, is exceptionally special.

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Full disclosure: I freaking love Dodge Challengers. Square body, round lights, can’t lose. It pairs all the anachronisms I love (V8, rear-drive, manual transmission, Dazed & Confused aesthetic) with modern features I really want in my next car (heated steering wheel). Will I own an R/T at some point? If an F8 Green manual falls into my price range after its first owner is done with it, maybe. But if I were a millionaire car collector, I would be copping this early-build Demon originally owned by Ralph Gilles.

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The listing is making its way around the internet, with people generally proclaiming the price is terrible or great, and I’m here to explain why I side with the latter, in spite of my typically budget-focused pragmatism.

Gilles is well-known in the car community as a talented designer. He’s currently heading Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ design department and based on briefly meeting him once, I reckon he’s a Good Dude in general. More significantly to the Demon connection, Gilles is credited with essentially making Dodge’s SRT performance division a thing.

The Demon may not be as technologically impressive as a modern supercar or anywhere near as refined as many European GT cars, but it’s a snapshot of a ridiculous moment in time when a car company built something capable of 10-second quarter-mile runs and put it in showrooms.

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The fact that this one was owned by a well-respected automotive executive who also happened to be instrumental in paving the proverbial road for this car to exist, yeah, I think that’s worthy of a spot in a serious car collection.

Jalopnik Staffer from 2013 to 2020, now Editor-In-Chief at Car Bibles

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DISCUSSION

goat7
son of a motherless goat (PSA: wash your hooves)

Without the original splitter guards? CP.