Here Are The Car Companies You'd Invest In

Here Are The Car Companies You'd Invest In

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Image: RIvian

While established automakers are spending billions to electrify entire lineups, dozens of startups have sprouted the last few years to offer EVs that the companies hope can compete in the mainstream. Many of these companies are worth billions of dollars despite having never actually built or sold anything.

We asked readers what car companies they’d invest in. These were their answers.

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2 / 12

Only Established Players

Only Established Players

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Image: Audi

None of them....

The auto industry is so hypercompetitive these days that I think the major OEM’s will squeeze out these start-up’s before they even get started. There’s already so many brands, I don’t know how you can continue to split up the market.

Based on the reviews of the mach-e, Polestar and Recharge products, iD and the e-tron, the major OEM’s can produce solid EV’s and there are more coming from GM and others. Then you have Tesla who is already the leader in EV’s with a very established and firm fanbase.

I really don’t see many of these surviving. Maybe Rivian and Lucid will survive, but Canoo, Atlis, Nikola, and others I see as doubtful.

Suggested by: Mustang23

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Ford

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Image: Ford

Ford. Hands down. Once they get through the chip shortage they’re going to be on fire. (And not like a Kia.) Undervalued and underestimated.

Suggested by: John Sibley (Facebook)

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4 / 12

Lucid And Bollinger

Lucid And Bollinger

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Image: Lucid

A stretch would be Lucid - I love the vehicle, but need more concrete evidence they can compete in the ultra-premium space and can deliver the goods.

Bollinger, Canoo, etc.?

Bollinger seems to be aiming at the same market as Lucid. But I dislike their design (it looks like the design team was “guided” by their CEO’s vision, much like the CyberTruck) and await production examples.

I do look forward to the affordable new Hyundai/Kia EVs, the Toyobaru EV clones, and whatever else the mainstream manufacturers can put out. At least they have the service/sales infrastructure to support the investment.

Suggested by: Saigon_Design

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Tesla

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Image: Tesla

Hard to say I think Tesla will have a monopoly on vehicles like Amazon is to e-commerce. If Tesla releases a $20,000 - $25,000 entry car they will dominate the market. If Tesla comes out with fully self driving vehicles that can pick people up that to will be hard to beat along with cybertruck.

Suggested by: Connor Mason (Facebook)

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Toyota

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Image: Toyota

Toyota, they may be going slowly towards the EV market but they look way ahead and they sure as shit have a roadmap. When they get up to speed on EV’s they will probably do like they have with the Corolla, Camry, and RAV4 and build solid mainstream electric appliances that sell. Also their learning from the past with the tsunami disruptions and actually planning for such again, like with their handling of the chip shortage, they paid attention early, reacted, and have avoided the massive pains others have had.

They may not make a lot of things I want to drive but they make them well and will likely continue to do so for a long time.

Suggested by: CitronC

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7 / 12

Not A Company, A Supplier

Not A Company, A Supplier

Here would be my pick - Bosch, Denso, Magna, Aisin, Continental and ZF F.

I won’t invest in a “car company/ brand” I would invest in their suppliers. Why, they are completely required in selling new, or a specific brand. Thus them make money on both new sales and long-term part replacement.

Suggested by: FutureDoc

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8 / 12

Automakers For The Indian Market

Automakers For The Indian Market

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Image: Tata Motors

I wouldn’t do this, but if someone told me that I HAD to get stocks in car companies, I would get

Honda, Hyundai, Suzuki, Tata, and Mahindra.

Why? That’s the Indian market for cars right there. India’s population is going to pass China’s soon and the Indian economy is not bad. Add the idea of exporting cars made in India to places like Nigeria (which also has a huge population) and I figure these 5 companies are in a decent place.

It is WAY too risky for my taste. But it’s the only place I can make any sort of reason to get only car stocks.

Suggested by: hoser68

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Morgan

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Morgan.

Not even out of nostalgia. They have a really proven track record of developing, spending, and profiting within their means. I feel that being a Morgan shareholder, while not necessarily being a get-rich-quick scheme, would mean that your investment is being treated respectfully and used wisely.

Suggested by: OctagonSpirit

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Rimac

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Image: Rimac Automobili

Rimac. Besides their insanely expensive hypercars, they are the force behind the electrification of the European manufacturers and do R&D and tech supply for lots of big names.

Suggested by: felixthegrumpycat

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Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus

Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus

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Image: Scuderia

Suggested by: davesaddiction @ opposite-lock.com

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