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Donkervoort's Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber

Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen

I know you wake up every morning wondering: “What’s Donkervoort up to?” Well, after claiming to have a car that can pull two g’s in a turn, its now adding an embellishment. Would you like your Dutch supercar in colored carbon fiber?

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We’re not yet sure what to make of the D8 GTO-JD70’s alleged party trick, that it’s supposed to be able to turn hard enough to effectively force twice the gravity your meat-and-water-sack (body) is accustomed to. I’m actually not even sure it would be the first car to claim 2g in turning... wasn’t there another super low-pro supercar that could do this? (Cursory research suggests it was the Dallara Stradale, if anybody wants to start a thread about that in the comment section.)

Anyway, I happen to think numbers are largely uninteresting here. It’s a tiny insectile car with an Audi RS3 engine, it’s called “Donkervoort,” and I’m sure it’ll be far faster than anyone will really be able to appreciate for an extended period of time. But you might have known that already–the car was introduced earlier this summer.

The new-news this week is that the car’s going to be offered as a Bare Naked Carbon Edition, which reportedly makes the ridiculously lithe vehicle even lighter (this car is about 1,500 pounds... before the carbon kit.)

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Since Donkervoort sent out a big batch of photos along with this announcement, let’s all enjoy them together here:

Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
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Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
Illustration for article titled Donkervoorts Getting Into Colored Carbon Fiber
Photo: Donkervoort Automobielen
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The D8 GTO-JD70 lists for about €200,000 (about $235,000) including the Kingdom of the Netherlands’ brutal 21 percent value-added tax, but the options list is extensive and you could run up a much higher tab spec’ing your Donk’ out just-so.

I’m into it. In fact, I think this is one of the coolest cars on the road and I would love to explain to everyone I met in traffic how to pronounce “Donkervoort.” In fact, shoot, how do you say the name of this preposterous car?

Jalopnik Staffer from 2013 to 2020, now Editor-In-Chief at Car Bibles

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DISCUSSION

flatisflat
flatisflat

Total non-engineer here with some not-even-a-back-of napkin-calc doubts: at what weight (and no significant aero accoutrement such as this here Donkervoort) — assuming best case scenario for street-car suspension design — CAN a car even hit 2G of lateral force?

My thinking being that there must be some form of lower limit where there simply isn’t enough available force, and thereby grip, to elicit 2G out of the machine during a turn. Maybe only with proper slicks on a good track surface?

Thoughts? Any bored mechanical engineers out there?