Delahaye USA Recreating Famous Cabriolet

Illustration for article titled Delahaye USA Recreating Famous Cabriolet

Our initial reaction to the idea of recreated Delahayes was one of reservation. How does one capture lightning in a bottle twice — and over fifty years after the original company went out of business? The original coachbuilt Delahayes are some of the most beautifully crafted automobiles of all time, so setting your sights on reproducing them is a tough target to aim for. This is exactly what Delahaye USA is undertaking, and so far we're impressed with the results. Currently under commission is a car which when completed will not only mimic the look and feel of the original, but thoroughly exceed it mechanically.

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Delehaye USA is currently building a reproduction of the Type 165 Figoni & Falaschi 1939 Delahaye Cabriolet, a car so slathered in concourse wins its practically sickening. This isn't just a fiberglass chop and drop job either. They're using wooden bucks and pounding out the aluminum body work just as the original coachbuilders would have done. Sure the body is going to be nice, but what about the guts? Instead of a the original V12 (which didn't make it into the original car until around 1981 due to the outbreak of WWII) this one will be receiving a BMW V12 and and an all new suspension. Fantastical features include a disappearing top, jump seats, power retractable windscreen for the rumble seat passengers, who have a full dash complimented by duplicate gauges, bespoke luggage and acres of pampered cow hide. Yes indeed, this will be a beauty, and Delahaye USA, if you need somebody to test drive and review those new masterpieces, give us a ring. [Delahaye USA]

Photo by John Lamm

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DISCUSSION

graverobber
Rob Emslie

That'll be beautiful when done. I have no problem with "tribute" cars as long as they are not passed off as originals, which they don't appear to be doing here.

In that center image of the chassis, is that a transaxle? That isn't a BMW-sourced component is it? I've looked through the site, but can't find any technical specs. Of course, I'm pretty lazy.