'74 Buick Apollo Isn't A Nova, Crusher Doesn't Care

Illustration for article titled 74 Buick Apollo Isnt A Nova, Crusher Doesnt Care

Malaise Novas have become pretty rare, and the badge-engineered Buick version has nearly disappeared from the earth. Here's one I found at a local self-service wrecking yard.

Illustration for article titled 74 Buick Apollo Isnt A Nova, Crusher Doesnt Care

This car appears to have received a pseudo-donk treatment prior to entering the metal-recycling food chain, judging from the rear wheels.

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Illustration for article titled 74 Buick Apollo Isnt A Nova, Crusher Doesnt Care

Later on in the 1970s, The General decided that a 350 is a 350 is a 350 and began the practice of dropping random Olds, Buick, and Chevy V8s in their cars, depending on what they had handy at the factory on a given day. Back in 1974, however, your Apollo got a genuine Buick engine… which had 150 horsepower versus the Chevy 350's 145.

Illustration for article titled 74 Buick Apollo Isnt A Nova, Crusher Doesnt Care

You don't see a lot of blue cars with red interiors these days. In fact, you didn't see a lot of them back in the Malaise Era. Perhaps this car has obtained a new paint job during its travels.

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DISCUSSION

My parents had a '74 yellowish-tan Apollo with a 350; the thing that stood out about that car, in addition to its so-so reliability, was the federally-mandated (for 1974 and '75) seat belt ignition interlock. Unless the driver and front-seat passenger buckled up, the car wouldn't start.

IIRC, so many people were annoyed by the interlock they'd defeat it just by buckling the seat belt before taking a seat and leaving it that way.