Johnny Bohmer is no stranger to making the cars go quick. One of his latest exploits was making a Lamborghini Aventador SV go quick, or 205 mph, which he says is the fastest-ever recorded for the Superveloce.

This particular SV makes 750 horsepower and 508 lb-ft of torque from its 6.5-liter V12, pumping all that power through a seven-speed automatic gearbox and weighing around 4,085 pounds.

The SVā€™s top speed on paper is 217 mph, though the actual top speed can vary based on conditions. Indeed, Bohmer got a different Aventador up to 208 mph last year.

Going quick wasnā€™t necessarily Lamborghiniā€™s goal with the Aventador, since it was designed for a (Lamborghini-sized) mass market, with over 7,000 made by late last year, selling at around $400,000 a car. The Koenigsegg Agera RS (25 made), Bugatti Veyron (450 made), and McLaren F1 (106 made) are all faster. But the Aventador, by contrast, was meant to be the successor to the MurciĆ©lago (over 4,000 produced), itself the successor to the Diablo (over 2,000 produced). The Aventador, in other words, is Lamboā€™s flagship and basically mass produced by supercar standards.

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Also, I mean, just look at the center console, filled with knobs and buttons that suggest that Lamborghiniā€™s primary aim may not have been streamlining.

The car is really made for driving 5 mph in a Monaco traffic jam, though it is blessed with the handling of a supercar while being comfortable to ride in, with an interior that doesnā€™t feel cheap or stripped down to save weight.

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All of which is not to say that, by any real standards, the Aventador isnā€™t frighteningly quick. The last time I was in one was at a track in New Jersey, where the driver pushed it to maybe six-tenths, the car reaching 150 mph or so on the straightaway. Around the corners was arguably more impressive. There are some cars that, even at low speeds, feel like death traps, while there are other cars like the Aventador that feel the opposite, and ooze confidence. You keep pushing it on the corners, and it remains absolutely, convincingly planted, giving you the feeling that you could ask the car to do almost anything and it would be there, answering the bell.