This is what it's like to be shot at with an AK-47

Trent Kimball, CEO of Texas Armoring Corporation (TAC), was tired of customers asking if his company's bullet-resistant glass in its armored cars actually resisted bullets. So he did what any reasonable CEO would do: he asked his employee to shoot at him with an AK-47. It's loud, scary, dangerous, and completely awesome.

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The last time I visited TAC there was much shooting at various kinds of bullet-resistant glass, steel, and kevlar. We all joked about someone getting behind the glass during the live-firing but no one was crazy enough to do it. Until now.

"I've never seen anything quite like it," said TAC's Jason Forston, adding "probably because of the inherent risk in pointing assault rifles at humans."

It's an inherent risk the company is dedicated to mitigating with their vehicles, which range from lightly-armored vehicles for worried individuals to IED-resistant SUVs for use in foreign conflict zones.

Illustration for article titled This is what it's like to be shot at with an AK-47
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The glass Kimball is crouching behind, if you were curious, is T7-level bullet-resistant and is 2.16 inches thick in the middle. It's rated to defeat up to 30-06 AP rounds and will deflect rounds from an M-16, AK-47, FN-FAL, and other similar weapons. This specific glass is from an S-Class Mercedes and features an offset edge so it looks stock, which is what you see flying off when it's shot.

"In a vehicle we would cover the offset with an overlap system to ensure complete protection," said Forston.

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When it comes to standing behind your product, we hope you don't work for an armored car company.

DISCUSSION

wacopalypsenow
wacopalypsenow

I have a hard time accepting this as professional. I'm from the school of "don't point the firearm at anyone/anything unless you want them/it dead, keep your finger off the trigger unless you want them/it dead." A company that makes manually-operated safeties for firearms would be acting dangerous, if too prove their product, pointed a gun w/ their safety 'on' at someone and tried to squeeze the trigger. I see no difference, and if I was buying bullet-proof glass, I would want technical specs and quality control over a gimmicky internet video. Unprofessional company is unprofessional.