These Are The Worst Winter Driving Tips You’ve Heard

These Are The Worst Winter Driving Tips You’ve Heard

From tips to increase grip or de-ice your car, these are the pointers to avoid when driving in winter

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A car drives on a snow-covered road
You may want to approach these tips with the utmost caution, kinda like trying to avoid a patch of ice.
Photo: Eric Baradat / Contributor (Getty Images)

We all know someone who thinks they’re God’s gift to driving. They think they’re so imbued with motoring skill that they simply must share their knowledge with the world. But sometimes, these people are full of it.

To uncover the torrid advice we’ve all been given during our times on the road, we asked you for the worst winter driving tips you’ve heard. Here are some of your best (or worst) answers.

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Use All Season Tires

Use All Season Tires

A row of tires covered in snow
Photo: Patrik Lundin / Stringer (Getty Images)

“All season tires are good enough.

“And it’s always said by somebody who has never experienced the benefits of driving on winter tires.

“Sure, they’re overkill for most people... Perhaps you could work from home, or only get a handful of snow days every year. It’s never a big deal until you slide into a tree or into another vehicle though. My beef is with the people who have never experienced winter driving with winter tires, telling others (especially new drivers) that winter tires are somehow a ‘waste of money’. How could ensuring your own safety and the safety of others be considered wasteful?

“I wish there was more opportunity for people to try out winter and all season tires back to back in winter conditions. Do that, then let people decide whether or not they are necessary for themselves. At least encourage people to explore all season tire options that are severe snow service rated. I know there are several options (like Michelin CrossClimate tires) that would, in most cases, be perfect for most people’s year round needs.”

If there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that if you’re planning to drive in snowy conditions, it’s best to be prepared. And that includes packing a shovel, warm clothes and swapping to winter tires.

Suggested by: shanepj13

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Don’t Worry About The Snow On Your Roof

Don’t Worry About The Snow On Your Roof

A car covered in snow
Photo: Mladen Antonov / Staff (Getty Images)

“You don’t need to clear all the snow off the car, it will blow away.”

Sure, the snow might blow off your roof if you leave it there. But it’ll probably blow right into the path of another driver. Don’t do this.

Suggested by: Nathan Leshchinsky (Facebook)

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Buy A Plymouth Valiant

Buy A Plymouth Valiant

A red Plymouth Valiant sedan
Photo: Plymouth

“A 1965 Plymouth Valiant is a better winter car than a 2002 Toyota Land Cruiser.”

Erm, I think this is aimed at you, David Tracy.

Suggested by: movebouv

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Pump It Real Good

Pump It Real Good

Two pedals in a car
Photo: Justin Sullivan / Staff (Getty Images)

“Pump the brakes when you skid. Although this used to be true and necessary, there’s still people who believe it needs to be done. Modern abs can pump the brakes more efficiently than you ever could.”

If you drive a car with ABS, the system will be infinitely better at controlling the brakes that your juddery foot.

Suggested by: Ed Potrafke (Facebook)

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Pour Boiling Water Onto Your Car

Pour Boiling Water Onto Your Car

A kettle boiling on a stove
Photo: Dan Kitwood / Staff (Getty Images)

“If your car door freezes shut pour hot water over it. I just heard this recently from someone living in Florida. Go figure.”

If your car is frosted over, don’t pour any boiling water anywhere near your doors, hood, windscreen, rear window, side mirrors or anywhere else on your car. Keep it for making a coffee.

Suggested by: mdensch

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Need Grip? Add Weight

Need Grip? Add Weight

A line of sandbags laid out on a street
Photo: Jack Taylor / Contributor (Getty Images)

“I have seen so many people put sand bags in the trunk of their FWD cars expecting that to give them better traction in the snow.”

While this could improve your car’s contact with the road in a rear-wheel-drive car, it’s not advised for anything with front-wheel-drive.

Suggested by: hughhart

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Driving Fast Will Get You Off The Road More Quickly

Driving Fast Will Get You Off The Road More Quickly

Cars driving on a snow-covered highway
Photo: Jeff Pachoud / Contributor (Getty Images)

“A friend of mine thought he was a winter driving expert since he was from the Midwest. His strategy was basically to just floor it when he hit any snow.”

I mean, I think it goes without saying that this is a very bad idea.

Suggested by: Daniel Reigada (Facebook)

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Follow A Plow

Follow A Plow

A snow plow clears a road
Photo: Pascal Pochard-Casabianca / Contributor (Getty Images)

“Drive behind a snowplow.

“Has anyone who says that ever seen a snowplow in operation? With the clouds of snow it throw into the air hampering visibility? And the steady stream of salt that’ll pepper your car like millions of small rocks?

“Better advice: just wait to go out until after the plows have come by.”

Snow plows are great at clearing the path ahead. But, all that snow has to go somewhere, right? So if you’re right behind one, you might find that a lot of it heads your way.

[Ed. note: And like the reader pointed out, plow trucks also haul those gargantuan buckets of salt to pour onto the roadway as they clear the way. Salt + Car = not good.]

Suggested by: skuhnphoto

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One For The Tesla Fans Out There

One For The Tesla Fans Out There

A blue Tesla electric car
Photo: Tesla

“Tesla owners believe turning down regen braking makes things safer. Regen braking doesn’t lock up the wheels. Neither does ABS. If you are sliding it is because you are going too fast for conditions. Sometimes five MPH is too fast for conditions. Newton’s first law is a thing and it likes to show how ugly it can get this time of year.”

I guess the moral of the story here is; if you drive a new car, don’t do anything to mess with its braking systems.

Suggested by: Luke Draayer (Facebook)

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More Tire Lies

More Tire Lies

Snow tires leave a trail in the snow
Photo: Yorick Jansesn / Contributor (Getty Images)

“You only need snows on the rear for traction. You don’t need them on the fronts.

“I kind of feel like turning and stopping is more important when you lose traction.”

If you’re going out and buying winter tires, why aren’t you buying four? This seems daft on so many levels.

Suggested by: balmertowner

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