Screenshot: Euro NCAP (YouTube)

The newly redesigned Mercedes G-Wagen, the expensive body-on-frame off-roader that for the first time ever has independent front suspension, was crashed tested by the European New Car Assessment Program, and the results are exemplary. Just watch as this boxy fortress shrugs off barriers and avoids pedestrians with ease.

“Mercedes-Benz’s rugged G-Class also comes in with a five-star rating with an impressive performance in each of the four areas of assessment,” Euro NCAP says in its press release, lauding the G-Class’ safety assist systems, as well as its ability to protect adult occupants, child occupants, and pedestrians. Here’s a look at the G-Wagen being put through the wringer.

You can read Euro NCAP’s full report here, but the gist of it is that the vehicle scored 90 percent, 83 percent, and 78 percent in the areas of adult occupant protection, child occupant protection, and “vulnerable road user” protection, respectively. The Magna Steyr-built poshmobile did especially well in side impact testing, managing 16 out of 16 points for adult occupant protection and managing the full 8 points for child protection.

The G-Wagen also managed a 72 percent in the “safety assist” category, thanks to a good Automatic Emergency Braking system, as well as features like a seat belt reminder and speed limit assist, though apparently the lane keeping system isn’t great. From Euro NCAP’s report:

The AEB system gave generally good results in tests of its functionality at highway speeds. The car has a lane assistance system which helps prevent inadvertent drifting out of lane but can also intervene in some more critical situations. The speed control system uses digital mapping combined with a camera to identify what the local speed limit is and to inform the driver, who can then set the limiter to the appropriate speed. A seatbelt reminder is standard for front and rear seats.

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The new G-Wagen has been receiving rapturous driving impressions from journalists, and now it has scored top safety marks. Plus it looks good. It took Mercedes decades to finally do a major G-Class redesign, but it appears to be paying off.