Safari All The Cars

Image: Craigslist
Image: Craigslist

Big fender flares, knobby all-terrain tires, maybe a lift kit, and perhaps a bit of fender or bumper trimming—these things look good on damn near any car. So maybe it’s time for us to just Safari-ize all the cars.

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This is, of course, a bullshit take, because as I’ve mentioned before, lifting vehicles often times functionally ruins them. But aesthetically, we can surely all agree, Safari-ing cars is good. Very good.

This comes after I recently spotted Roadshow writer Chris Paukert’s tweet about a 1983 Toyota Celica Supra for sale on Craigslist for $2,500:

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As you can see in these images, it’s not just a standard A60 Celica Supra liftback. It’s got some meaty tires on the corners, a tough looking bull-bar on the front, and mud flaps. As Paukert points out, the Supra’s big flares just make this setup work:

Image: Craigslist
Image: Craigslist

This “Safari” look works on lots of other great sports cars, too, including the mighty Porsche 911, which has a rich Rally history. Affable The Smoking Tire presenter Matt Farah recently Safari’d his 911, and the results are lovely:

One of my all-time favorite applications of safari-treatment sports cars is the 350Z, a vehicle that, normally, I think is merely “fine.” With a lift and some big meats, though, it’s fantastic:

So how about that for a novel idea: We should lift more cars and put bigger tires on them so that they look better.

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Oh wait, we’re already doing that? Damn, I thought I had something, there.

Sr. Technical Editor, Jalopnik. Always interested in hearing from auto engineers—email me. Cars: Willys CJ-2A ('48), Jeep J10 ('85), Jeep Cherokee ('79, '91, '92, '00), Jeep Grand Cherokee 5spd ('94).

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