Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

You Can Buy The First C6 Corvette Z06 For $79,000, But You Can't Take It On The Street

Illustration for article titled You Can Buy The First C6 Corvette Z06 For $79,000, But You Cant Take It On The Street
Image: Mecum

There’s some kind of odd mystique surrounding the “first” model made of any material item, even though no one can tell the difference and No. 2 onward are likely a lot cheaper. If you’re into firsts, though, the first example of the sixth-generation Chevrolet Corvette Z06 to roll off the line is for sale for $79,000.

Advertisement

But don’t think you’ll be proudly driving it out of the showroom, because this car isn’t street legal.

Illustration for article titled You Can Buy The First C6 Corvette Z06 For $79,000, But You Cant Take It On The Street
Image: Mecum
Advertisement

The first Corvette Z06 off of the line for the C6 generation, built in 2005, is for sale through GT Motor Cars in Connecticut. It isn’t the first time the car has been sold, and a Mecum Auctions listing from 2015 noted all of its noteworthy attributes, including being: the first C6 Z06 built at the famous Bowling Green assembly plant and a pre-production development car; driven at places like the Nürburgring and Spa-Francorchamps; and taken over 200 mph on the Autobahn. Its sale will also come with original paperwork and historical documents, the GT Motor Cars listing says, both of which were also part of the Mecum sale.

But even with its 7.0-liter V8 engine that makes a rated 505 horsepower and its six-speed manual pictured in the sale listing, this pre-production Z06 won’t see any public roads. As the Mecum listing mentioned:

This vehicle is not certified to comply with any federal, state or local laws, rules or regulations and may not be driven on public roads. Sold on Bill of Sale only.

The GT Motor Cars listing doesn’t include a price, but Jalopnik reached out and was told that the ask is $79,000. That’s a lot more than the car has sold for or been bid to in the past, as Mecum listed its 2015 high bid at $44,000 and Road & Track notes that Barrett-Jackson auctioned it for $50,600 in 2009.

Illustration for article titled You Can Buy The First C6 Corvette Z06 For $79,000, But You Cant Take It On The Street
Image: Mecum
Advertisement

But perceived value is up to the individual, and perhaps someone out there will think $79,000 is just the right price for a car they can’t take out of the driveway.

H/t Road & Track

Staff writer, Jalopnik

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

I was reading the comments and see there’s some relative confusion. As someone who both owns a Corvette and loves to deal with the “Corvette numbers” I looked into it a little more.

Despite both Mecum and other sources stating this was the FIRST production Z06 this wasn’t the first Corvette BUILT for the 2006 MY, pre-production, pilot, or otherwise. Mecum lists the VIN sequence as “650016EX” which would have made it the 16th experimental 2006 MY Corvette built. The really strange thing however is I’m seeing “650001EX” - which would be the first experimental 2006 MY Corvette built - as actually being the first Z06. 02EX-15EX were run-of-the-mill 2006 MY Corvettes. Maybe I’m incorrect and possibly “16EX” rolled off before “01EX”; a weird situation.

Corvettes get assign a “job number”. This is different from the VIN number, which is why GM can place these “EX” VINs that exceed the VIN digit count onto cars. In a way here the VIN is kind of a place holder. What this then creates is a situation where the true “number 1" VIN typically has a decently high “job number”, say in the 40s or 50s. These cars will have a detailed “job number”, but no detailed VIN info since they’re “EX” cars.

This sort of situation has existed for since at least the C4 that I know of and the upper echelon of the Corvette market is filled with buyers and sellers of “EX”, pilots, and “sale-able” pilot cars (typically early pilots assigned actual VINs).

Since the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green retains info on all Corvettes built since 1984 you can actually research all the correlations for job builds to VIN, and they can even look up where cars were original sold to (as in if which dealer, if a car was ordered through the dealer by an individual, or museum delivered).