You Can Buy Carroll Shelby's 1968 Black Hornet Mustang

It's being auctioned off by Barrett-Jackson with no reserve.

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1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet
Photo: Barrett-Jackson

Old Mustangs are basically a dime a dozen, but a Mustang from Carroll Shelby’s personal collection? Now that’s something really special. And the chance to actually buy one doesn’t come along often. But if you happen to be rich as shit, you’re in luck. Barrett-Jackson will soon auction off Carroll Shelby’s 1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet.

1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet
Photo: Barrett-Jackson

Billed as a true one-of-one Mustang, the Black Hornet was “produced as a tribute to the Green Hornet in every way except for its color, independent suspension and EFI fuel delivery system.” If you’re not familiar, the Green Hornet Mustang wasn’t the car driven by Britt Reid in Green Hornet the TV show. That was a customized 1966 Imperial Crown. Instead, it’s the prototype that eventually became the first Mustang GT/CS California Special.

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1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet
Photo: Barrett-Jackson

In addition to the Shelby 10-spoke wheels, the Black Hornet has “a 428 Cobra Jet big-block V8 engine, high volume fuel pump, Holley carburetor, aluminum intake and heads, Mallory ignition, and Griffin radiator,” as well as “many other upgrades.” It also comes with a diecast toy car replica of the Black Hornet.

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1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet
Photo: Barrett-Jackson

One thing it doesn’t come with, though, is a lot of miles on the odometer. Shelby kept the Black Hornet in his personal collection for more than four decades, but by the time he signed it over to his foundation in 2008, the car only had 218 miles on it. Since then, it’s been driven significantly more and has now been driven an entire 564 miles.

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1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet
Photo: Barrett-Jackson

Considering the collectible nature of the Black Hornet, it’s probably safe to assume that whoever wins the auction will drive it about as frequently as they play with the diecast model that comes with it. It’s also probably safe to assume it will sell for a truly absurd amount of money. But hey, you never know. There’s no reserve, so theoretically anything could happen.

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1968 Ford Mustang Black Hornet
Photo: Barrett-Jackson