Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

Watching This 1928 Frazer Nash Tear Ass Around The Track Is The Best Thing Ever

I saw this today on the wonderful Innovative, Banned, and Unique Racing Cars Facebook page, and while watching it I almost ruptured by mid-abdominal delight gland. That’s a 1928 Frazer Nash known as the Owlet, and watching that tall, skinny thing bob and weave and tear ass around the track is just fantastic.

Advertisement

I believe the car is a slightly customized Frazer Nash Super Sports Saloon – the Super Sports had no running boards, which is why I’m guessing that’s what it was. These used a little inline-4 of only 1.5, which transferred its (maybe up to 60?) horsepower to the rear wheels via a set of big chains right under the floor.

This one is driven by Patrick Blakney-Edwards, of, Blakney Motorsport. There’s some interior video of him driving it, too, which really drives home how archaic this thing is:

The car is nicknamed “Owlet” I think because of the look of the rear bodywork which, yeah, sort of looks like a baby owl:

Illustration for article titled Watching This 1928 Frazer Nash Tear Ass Around The Track Is The Best Thing Ever
Advertisement

Driving a modern car on a track, at speed, really pushing the car, is plenty hard as it is. Doing the same thing in this top-heavy, chain-driven nearly 90-year-old artifact with tires the thickness of hula hoops is nothing short of astounding.

And, hey, it looks like it was up for sale last September! Maybe it’s still available! This could be you in there!

I absolutely adore seeing old cars wrung out like this. Give ‘em hell, owlet.

Senior Editor, Jalopnik • Running: 1973 VW Beetle, 2006 Scion xB, 1990 Nissan Pao, 1991 Yugo GV Plus, 2020 Changli EV • Not-so-running: 1977 Dodge Tioga RV (also, buy my book!: https://rb.gy/udnqhh)

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

manwich
Manwich - now Keto-Friendly

I see the driver pulling a lever in and out of the dash at times.

What is that lever, what does it do and why is the driver pulling it in or out when he does?