Watch The 'World's Fastest Camera Car' Lamborghini Huracan Chase Down A Ferrari

We’ve seen pictures of that crazy Lamborghini Huracan with a giant camera hanging off its nose, but now there’s footage showing exactly why the “Huracam” machine was built in the first place: to chase down supercars.

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Incline Dynamic Outlet, the company that built the Lamborghini “Huracam”—a vehicle that the group claims is the fastest camera car in the world—recently finished a paid gig at The Thermal Club in California. And now there’s a minute worth of behind-the-scenes footage showing the camera-wielding supercar in action:

Trevor Thompson (@trevorfromnowhere)

I spoke with Nathan Garofalos, who—along with his friend Chris—came up with the idea for the Huracan build while filming Deadliest Catch. He told me that the footage above shows a paid job that his company Incline Dynamic Outlet did for an unnamed client.

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He told me that the footage is meant to show what the Huracam can do that a normal camera cannot. “So like, [with a] normal arm-car, if you’ve got 1,600 to 2,400 pounds on top of an SUV... your car can flip going 60 MPH in a turn,” he told me. “We can go 120 out of race-line in a turn, no problem; we did that for four hours at Thermal.”

“For the first time, we’re actually able to capture stuff in speed, and we’re not under-cranking our shots,” he told me, after which he explained how many movie-makers shoot a certain way to make car chase scenes look fast without them actually being fast. “A common way to make stuff look faster is you shoot it at 18 frames a second; so then when you put 18 frames per second on a 24 frames per second timeline, it’s sped up, looking like it’s moving much faster.”

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Trevor Thompson (@trevorfromnowhere)

The problem with this method, Garofalos told me, is that it can make the wheels look weird and panning and tilting can yield artifacts.

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But the Huracam doesn’t need such movie magic to make car chase scenes look fast, because they can actually be fast, with Garofalos telling me: “The viewer’s gonna be able to see cars in action footage like they’ve never seen before.”

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About the author

David Tracy

Writer, Jalopnik. 1979 Jeep Cherokee Golden Eagle, 1985 Jeep J10, 1948 Willys CJ-2A, 1995 Jeep Cherokee, 1992 Jeep Cherokee auto, 1991 Jeep Cherokee 5spd, 1976 Jeep DJ-5D, totaled 2003 Kia Rio