These Are The Cities You Think Have The Best Public Transport

These Are The Cities You Think Have The Best Public Transport

Some cities have trams, others have super trams. But, which has the best?

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A photo of a subway train in Sweden.
Where in the world is the best public transport?
Photo: Jonathan Nackstrand (Getty Images)

As much as we’d like to drive everywhere we go, sometimes it just isn’t practical to do so. And in that instance, you might need to take a plane, train or other public-serving automobile. But if you do need to rely on public transport, how does your location impact your options?

That’s what we set out to answer yesterday when we asked you what cities around the world offer the best public transport options? We received a lot of great answers back, so here are the ten best suggestions for cities with great public transport.

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Tokyo

Tokyo

A photo of a train in Tokyo at sunset.
Photo: Philip Fong (Getty Images)

“Not often that you have an absolute answer, but in this case, hands down, Tokyo (or any major cities in Japan). Nothing compares when combined with buses, cabs, trains, subways, and all that. They just work like a fucking magic.”

By far the most popular answer today was the capital of Japan. Renowned for its high-speed rail, efficient local train service and gleaming buses, Tokyo’s transit really is a force to behold.

Suggested by: jbjb21

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Prague

Prague

A photo of a Prague subway train in a station.
Photo: Michal Cizek (Getty Images)

“It’s been a while since I was out there, but in all my travels Prague had the best system I’ve encountered. By best, I mean most comprehensive. Between the easy to understand subway system, the trams that run 24/7, and easy access to the main train station you had easy options to get around and get out of town easily.”

An easy to read map and 24-hours a day service makes for a tourists dream. It’s also fun to note that the overhead announcers on Prague’s Metro system appears on Radiohead b-side ‘A Reminder’.

Suggested by: tyvmty

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Stockholm

Stockholm

Passengers leaving a train in Stockholm.
Photo: Jonathan Nackstrand (Getty Images)

“For me, Stockholm was fantastic. Everything from the buses to the trains were comfortable, clean, reliable, and incredibly easy to navigate, even to a first time visitor.

“Plus, they really decorated the subway stations and made them much nicer than the drab, dank images I have of the U.S. systems.”

A vibrant, welcoming subway station can make all the difference for any traveler. That’s what drew this poster to Stockholm’s subway system, which has 100 stations that have been serving passengers since the 1950s.

Suggested by: apeddlerofdeath

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Paris

Paris

A photo of the entrance to a Metro station in Paris.
Photo: Lionel Bonaventure (Getty Images)

“Easy. Paris. The Metro has the unbeatable combo of Art Nouveau station entries…

“Plus, a cool 80's song by Berlin…”

Art Nouveau-inspired stations and entrances are enough to guarantee Paris and its Metro rail system a spot on our list. They just look so very, very lovely.

Suggested by: majordawlish

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Washington, DC

Washington, DC

A photo of people sat inside a Washington Metro train.
Photo: Luke Sharrett (Getty Images)

“I only have experience with US cities and not many of them.

“But Washington DC’s Metro system is pretty good. Likely not in the top 1000 world wide, but by US standards, it’s very good, if you are a tourist. Sure it’s ugly, out of date and janky. But it exists and goes where you want to go. You can do DC without a rental car because of it.”

A take that Jalopnik’s own Adam Ismail agrees firmly with, he praised the DC system, as the “cars and stations are big, lines are easy to understand,” and “things seemed to arrive on time.” What more could you ask for?

Suggested by: yeardley68

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Singapore

Singapore

A train crossing a bridge in Singapore.
Photo: Roslan Rahman (Getty Images)

“Without a shadow of a doubt, Singapore.

“My family and I lived there for several years in the 2000s, and we didn’t even own a car- nor did we ever need one! Singapore deliberately makes car ownership exorbitantly expensive to limit road congestion (a Prius is like $200K there), and instead has built an incredible network of trains, buses, and subsidized cabs for everyone to use.

“And they work brilliantly. The buses and MRT (train) work together to serve the whole island effectively and quickly. It’s more modern than the London underground because it’s not built on the bones of 100+ year old infrastructure as well.”

Singapore’s Mass Rapid Transit system covers 134 miles of track and features 127 stations. Each year, the system carries an average of three million passengers. And, if that wasn’t enough, the network will also double in length by 2040. Impressive stuff.

Suggested by: zcorpion111

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Vancouver

Vancouver

A photo of the Vancouver Skytrain.
Photo: Don Emmert (Getty Images)

“Vancouver. Hands down.

“Buses, three Skytrain lines (about to expand to four), Seabus, and the West Coast Express. Getting around Vancouver and the Lower Mainland is efficient, fast, easy, reasonably priced, and safe.

“Runner up in Canada, Montreal if you’re on the island. Montreal’s Metro is a marvel.”

A firm favorite in North America, Vancouver was praised for its variety of transport options. Most notable is the city’s three Skytrain lines, with opened in the 1980s and has almost 50 miles of track.

Suggested by: JohnnyWasASchoolBoy

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Odawara

Odawara

A photo of a Japanese Bullet Train passing through a city.
Photo: MaedaAkihiko via Wikimedia Commons

“A lot of votes for Tokyo, which is understandable. I’m biased, but my vote goes to Odawara, 50 miles south-west from Tokyo on the Pacific coast.

“A city of 200,000 with 17 trains stations (I just counted), including Odawara station, which has 14 platforms and 4 lines. One of those is the Tokaido Shinkansen, with 5 trains up to Tokyo (30 minute journey) and 5 down to Nagoya and Osaka every two hours. Also Tokaido main line to Tokyo connecting as far as Gunma and down to Shizuoka and beyond, and the Odakyu line connecting Hakone through Odawara to Shinjuku. The fourth is the local Daiyuzan line.

“Plus an extensive and frequent bus network, an abundance of taxis and “daikoh”, a service to pick you up when you have gone out in your own car for a drink and drive you and your car home.

“And, on the private transport side, a direct expressway connection to Tokyo.”

Another Japanese city and another impressive mass transit offering that we can all be jealous of. Seriously, why can’t everywhere be a bit more like Japan?

Suggested by: harryuden

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Los Angeles

Los Angeles

A photo of a bus driving in L.A.
Photo: Patrick T Fallon (Getty Images)

“As we Americans all know, ‘best’ means ‘most’, and with that criteria properly clarified, the best public transit is Los Angeles with 6 rail lines, 3 shuttle lines, and 113 bus lines for the city alone, not including other connecting bus lines from other cities and areas in the county.

“(New York City has more bus routes, but they are operated across 5 counties).”

Los Angeles definitely has the statistics to back up its claim as the world’s best. But would you rather ride to work in LA or Tokyo?

Suggested by: burnersbabyburners

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Helsinki

Helsinki

A photo of a train in a station in Helsinki.
Photo: Seppo Samuli (Getty Images)

“I’m going to put a vote in for my current home of Helsinki. Generally the public transport is well scheduled, on time and clean. I’ve lived in London, there’s lots of public transport, but as others have pointed out the infrastructure is old and it shows. There’s vandalism and some of the night buses can be dangerous.

“I’ve also lived in Tokyo, and the public transport there is great. The only problems I ever encountered were the overcrowding and the young lady who asked if she could practice her English with me only to end up trying to sell me The Watchtower.

“Helsinki public transport is often preferable over driving. There are times when I have access to a car and an open parking space at work, I have to seriously consider whether its worth the hassle of driving (it’s about 50/50). Also, it’s much less crowded than other places I’ve lived.”

This sounds a bit like the Goldilocks way of thinking. London is too old, Tokyo is too busy, but Helsinki is just right.

Suggested by: duncanfind

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