Some endurance racing series are now requiring air conditioning as a way to prevent driver fatigue. How do these systems work? In the Nismo GT-R GT3 car, one pipe goes into the helmet, one goes into the seat and the other pipe goes wherever the driver wants to stick it.

Race cars aren't particularly well-sealed from the elements, often with cabin holes that go right outside. Lightness and functionality are more important than sealing up a driver from the outside elements, so they can't really blow out into the open space of the interior. Air has to be routed somewhere for it to actually cool off a driver, hence all the tubes. The inside of a race car can get up to around 122 degrees F, and when you're basically wearing a big nomex quilt, an air conditioner of some sort is definitely welcome.

Seats with vents for air conditioning have been around for a while. I can remember seeing Racetech's version for the first time and going "huh huh huh, this has air conditioning for your BUTT" all day long, because yes indeed-y doo doo (huh huh, doo doo), I am twelve.

Yeah, yeah, the cooled air gets routed up to your back, too, but butt sweat is the funkiest of them all, and aircon for your butt isn't just funny, but functional, too.

In addition to butt cooling, the video mentions the GT3 team's two other aircon pipes. Ever wondered what the big, funny tubes sticking off drivers' helmets are for? Here's an explanation. Some helmets also have water tubes, too, but the big air duct looking ones are usually just that: for air. Why? The helmet is a conveniently sealed-up space that lets air go right on a sweaty driver's skull.

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As for the third tube, I can sort of tell that the announcer doesn't really want to specify swamp-crotch on camera when he mentions it. "Down into the, uhhhhh...footwell." Yeah, footwell. Sure. Let's roll with that.