The 2018 Nissan Rogue Shows That Even The Affordable Cars Are Getting Semi-Autonomous Tech

Illustration for article titled The 2018 Nissan Rogue Shows That Even The Affordable Cars Are Getting Semi-Autonomous Tech

We’ve seen a few new cars dabble in semi-autonomous driving technology, but by and large they’ve been expensive luxury cars like the Tesla Model S and X, Volvo S90 and XC90, Cadillac CT6 and various Mercedes-Benzes. Nissan’s taking a different tack by putting its new ProPilot Assist system on a pretty affordable crossover, the 2018 Nissan Rogue. That’s a big deal.

Nissan will start selling the 2018 Rogues starting Oct. 24 with ProPilot Assist available on the top-level SL trim as part of the Platinum Package. The Rogue SL starts at $31,060.

Illustration for article titled The 2018 Nissan Rogue Shows That Even The Affordable Cars Are Getting Semi-Autonomous Tech
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ProPilot Assist, we must emphasize, does not mean fully autonomous. It merely helps keep the car centered in the lane, keeps to a set speed, maintains a set distance to the vehicle in front of it and can navigate stop-and-go traffic. The last one is the really big achievement here; lots of cars have advanced cruise control for the highway, but now we’re seeing traffic assistance for cheaper cars too.

It’d be something like Level 2 autonomy, according to our chart.

Nissan announced earlier this year that the 2018 Leaf would also be equipped with ProPilot assist, but that’s not available until April. If you want semi-autonomous tech at a reasonable price sooner, then the Rogue is the way to go.

It’s pretty safe to assume that Nissan will keep selling boatloads of Rogues, which means that more and more people will have access to this technology.

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I don’t think this makes the Rogue actually cool, but it is a harbinger of what’s to come. Just don’t expect fully robotic cars anytime soon.

Writer at Jalopnik and consumer of many noodles.

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DISCUSSION

ash78
Ash78, voting early and often

As someone who telecommutes (read: rarely deal with rush hour) and then just spent 90 minutes going 8 miles yesterday, bring on the stop & go assistance NOW.

But that type of traffic is so nuanced, I still can’t wrap my head around how well it will truly work in a mass setting. It’s like a giant Entropy of Assholes on a good day. And I suspect autonomy will err on the side of safety, not assertiveness. Cars can’t wave at others, read their minds, give the finger, yell out the window, and so on. It still seems like a case of something that would be great if we all have it, but not so great when it’s just a minority of us. Gotta start somewhere.