Image: Bugatti

This month, the $12.5-million Bugatti La Voiture Noire debuted at the Geneva Motor Show, mysteriously letting us gaze upon its exterior glory and nothing else. But there was a reason, other than the fact that we’re not rich enough to handle it: The car won’t actually be done for at least another two years.

The La Voiture Noire, which means “the black car” in French, showed up at Geneva as a one-off car with a carbon-fiber body, Bugatti’s signature 1,500-horsepower, quad-turbo, 8.0-liter W16 engine and a price of about $19 million after taxes. But video of the car making a slow and eerily quiet drive outside of the show wound up on YouTube not long after the debut, and Carscoops asked Bugatti for more info about what exactly was on display at Geneva.

A spokesperson for the company said the car on display wasn’t the full vehicle, and that the final version that’ll be delivered to the customer is a couple of years away. From the story:

“It’s not the final car. We only started working on the project half a year ago, when the customer agreed to our project proposal, we started building it. The car will be delivered only in two to two and a half years”, said Mr. Bravo, admitting that “the car in Geneva also didn’t have an interior design yet.”

Basically, the Geneva show car is a rolling display shell in the same vein of many non-functional concepts, intended to preview the actual model to show-goers.

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Carscoops wrote that the supercar at the show had neither its W16 engine nor an interior, which is why we only ever saw it from the outside. We at Jalopnik just figured we weren’t wealthy enough to look at the interior without sunglasses or significantly higher credit lines, which is also highly probable. The car currently has an electric powertrain instead of its real one, according to Carscoops, so that it can move around at shows and other events without being pushed.

So, yeah, that fancy new, one-off Bugatti we all gawked over the price of was really just a hollow display for now, probably with less of an interior than the slightly suspicious Miata you picked up from Craigslist for $4,000.

That’ll all change over the next couple of years, though, and we can all go back to feeling unworthy once it does.