That Infamously Low Bridge Has Some Tough Competition

Illustration for article titled That Infamously Low Bridge Has Some Tough Competition
Photo: Westboro Fire Department

The infamous “11-foot-8" bridge in Durham, North Carolina, has delivered far fewer hilarious crashes after it gained another eight inches in height, but that bridge isn’t the only low bridge looking for trucks to snack on.

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The Reading Eagle reported on Tuesday that a truck driver tried and failed to squeeze his rig, hauling a shipping container, under an 11-foot, 7-inch rail bridge in Ontelaunee Township, Pennsylvania. For those of you counting, that’s an inch shorter than the bridge in Durham before it was raised.

Illustration for article titled That Infamously Low Bridge Has Some Tough Competition
Photo: Northern Berks Regional Police

How did the truck driver get things so wrong? According to police, the truck driver was following a GPS route and thought that the bridge clearance sign said 13-feet 6-inches, not 11-feet, 7-inches. Oops.

Due to the bridge’s awfully-low height, it’s common for trucks and other tall vehicles to get a bit shaved off of the top while trying to roll under it.

But that’s not the only one. WHDH News Boston reported that a 12-foot, 6-inch clearance bridge in Westboro, Massachusetts, delivered some heavy carnage to a truck that failed to clear it on Thursday.

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Photo: Westboro Fire Department
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Despite this bridge actually being higher than the infamous Durham bridge, it managed to crumple the semi’s trailer like a beer can. Motorists had to face an annoying delay as traffic was reduced to a single lane while the truck was extracted.

But unlike the bridge in Durham, there aren’t cameras around to watch the action unfold at any of these bridges. The cameras at the “11-foot-8+8" bridge are still catching people running the light and shaving off the top of their trucks.

Someone get a camera to these other low-ass bridges! We demand to see trucks opened up like cans!

Staff Writer at Jalopnik and learning pilot. Smart Fortwo (x4), Honda Beat, Suzuki Every, AmTran Bus, VW Jetta TDI (x2), VW Touareg, Audi TT, Buell Lightning, Triumph Tiger, Genuine Stella...

DISCUSSION

andyindividual
andyindividual

So, what’s the consensus here? When self driving rigs become ubiquitous, will they get it right, or will they rely on inaccurate or outdated GPS nav data? Will they be better trained to read a sign than your average driver?

I sense there is some sort of truck/bridge bingo parlor game in this to be enjoyed.