Tesla's New Autopilot Will Steer, Park And Map The Road You're Driving On

Illustration for article titled Teslas New Autopilot Will Steer, Park And Map The Road Youre Driving On

The version 7.0 update of the Tesla Model S’s running software will use the car’s large suite of sensors to help it automatically steer, switch lanes, parallel park, and help keep you from crashing. The instrument cluster will be updated to include a real-time visualization of the road.

Advertisement

The autosteer function is still considered “Beta,” and for that reason will still require drivers to have hands on the wheel, but it theoretically will let the car follow lines on a highway. If you want to change lanes, you can just tap the turn signal and the car will move over when its sensors decide it’s safe to do so. The steering wheel moves on its own.

Illustration for article titled Teslas New Autopilot Will Steer, Park And Map The Road Youre Driving On
Advertisement

Another sensor-based software feature is an automatic emergency steering and side collision warning. This puts a “fluid-line” style proximity warning display around the car in the instrument cluster to let a driver know when solid objects are close.

Automatic parallel parking isn’t the most exciting news in automotive tech, we’ve been seeing this on nicer mass-production cars for years. But it’s a first for Tesla. At very low speed, a “P” icon will appear on the touchscreen next to the backup camera. Touch the letter and the Model S will maneuver itself into a space without any further driver input.

Illustration for article titled Teslas New Autopilot Will Steer, Park And Map The Road Youre Driving On

Elon Musk is in the middle of a full presentation right now, more details on the rest of Tesla’s 7.0 software and its future coming soon when he’s done talking.

Advertisement

Contact the author at andrew@jalopnik.com.

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

infinite-rkitekt
Infinite_Rkitekt

I always wonder about how the car knows what lane you are in. I understand a lot of them use sensors to see the lines and keep you within them. Now, how does the sensors see the lines if its the dead of winter here in Canada? They couldn’t rely 100% on GPS and what would occur if there is construction? Many times on highways where I am there are arrow signs, but no cones or temporary lines drawn to guide traffic. I wonder how these automated systems cope with those conditions? Especially where people are accustomed to driving through these areas faster than the posted limit (even if the fines are doubled in a construction zone). Plus, the fines are doubled when workers are present and how will the car know if they are present?