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Tesla Could Use Up All The World's Laptop Batteries

Illustration for article titled Tesla Could Use Up All The Worlds Laptop Batteries

Based on current production predictions of 21,000 cars this year, and up to 40,000 by 2015, it's possible Tesla could use the entire global supply of 18650 model LiOn batteries for its Model S sedans. Sure, there's way more laptops sold with those batteries, but every Model S with the 85 kWh battery pack uses over 7,000 of the cells.

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The Model S uses about 2,000 times as many cells as a normal laptop battery, and those cells are commodity 18650 cylindrical cells. Yep, that means if you had the time and resources to pull apart a Model S, you'd end up with a garage full of little cylindrical cells, like the Model S was a giant R/C car using thousands of AAAs.

If Tesla does manage to ramp production up to the 40,000 cars/year that they're planning, that would require the entire current output of 18650 LiOn cells to supply them. So what's going to happen?

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Well, things will have to scale up, clearly. Panasonic, a Tesla investor and partner, has already started planning increasing capacity by re-opening old lines and starting up new ones. Tesla has made by far the biggest impact on the battery industry of any non-computer/electronics manufacturer, and it's looking like they may become the dominant customer very soon.

Tesla's success took the battery industry somewhat by surprise, and if Tesla's growth plans are to be realized, there's lots more growing that's going to be needed from the industry, and soon.

(Source: Green Car Reports, Slashdot)

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DISCUSSION

AphexNinja
ApheXNinjA

I find it astonishing people still buy into electric cars being green... when it's not at all, in fact, it's just as bad, and sometimes worse, than driving a normal car.

Each kWh used by this, or any electric car being charged, is 1.341lbs of Co2... To put that in perspective...

Most electric cars are around 2.1 - 3.1 miles per kWh (25(mi) / 2.6 = 9.61 x 1.341 = 12lbs of Co2) , the average car is around 20-30 miles per gallon, and roughly 14lbs of co2 are created per gallon...

What's that all total? A whole lot of bullshit for people buying electric cars because they're "green". No, they're not, they're not at all, in fact, if you include how hazardous the batteries are... you got yourself a driving environmental mess.

Electric cars will not be viable until we invent a new battery — and by then, hydrogen powered cars should be standard.