That's a ridiculous amount of money, not a ridiculous amount of drool. Though the latter would totally be forgiven, as this is an incredibly rare Lamborghini Miura SV Jota. How rare? Well the total number of Lamborghini Miuras comes out to somewhere around 740. And only somewhere around five bore the name Miura SV Jota.

Of course, because this is a Lamborghini, and Lamborghini is Italian, and this is a Miura, and it was built in the early 1970s, we can only give very approximate numbers for anything that requires serious record keeping.

But because this is now 2015, we can provide another very approximate number:

$2,000,000.

At least.

This particular Miura SV Jota is actually expected to fetch somewhere north of that number, as it actually went unsold the last time it crossed the auction block even when someone tried to bid a cool two mil, according to Autoblog. Next week it's expected to finally sell at the RM Auctions in Arizona, when someone comes up with all the money in the world.

So at this point you're probably wondering what makes this Lamborghini so damn special, beyond the fact that really all Lamborghinis are special. First off, it's a Miura. The original supercar, the first time I saw one in real life I was maybe 12 or 13, and I was riding in the back seat of my mom's Honda Accord. We actually passed it on the left as it was just toodling along in the slow lane, but even then, it was spitting angry, staccato blasts of flame out of the exhaust pipe. It was a red Miura SV, with gold on the bottom, and it was gorgeous.

Yes, the Lamborghini Miura is so special, you remember exactly what it was like the first time you saw one.

And then this particular Miura for sale is an SV Jota, derived from one of Lamborghini's first aborted racing programs. A project of New Zealand racing driver Bob Wallace, the Jota prototype was intended to explore what it would be like if someone actually took a Lamborghini took the track.

Irascible Lamborghini founder Ferruccio Lamborghini being irascible Lamborghini founder Ferruccio Lamborghini, he declared himself and the company not interested at all, and the prototype was destroyed.

Though not before word got out.

Five customers sent their Miuras back to the factory to be upgraded to Jota specs, just to keep the dream alive.

This particular Jota started life painted in white with a blue interior, but now it's red which I'm sure you won't mind. Spending most of its life in Japan over the ensuing decades since birth, it's been stateside since 2007.

And now it can live wherever you want it to live.

That is, if you have all of the money.

Photos credit: RM Auctions