Porsche 992 GT3 Breaks Cover With A Wing That Means Business

Porsche 992 GT3 back
Image: Porsche

The 992 GT3 is nearly upon us. In anticipation, Porsche released a handful of images of a preproduction version of the next track-bred 911, and well, would you take a gander at that rear wing?

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen the new GT3's most prominent aerodynamic device, but it is our clearest look yet at the undisguised final design. “Hung” wings like this still aren’t so common on road cars, but the awkward shape has a purpose. Because the pylons support the wing from above, air passing under the wing isn’t disrupted as much as it would normally be. That results in less drag than the conventional approach and more efficient downforce production overall.

Porsche 992 GT3 rear wing
Image: Porsche
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The 992 GT3's other visual distinctions can be seen mostly at the front, where you’ll find a new bumper design with a wide central air intake flanked by slats at either side that channel air behind the wheels. There are also those deep vents near the tip of the hood — certainly harder to miss than the slim passages that previous GT3s had.

The result is said to be a 50 percent increase in downforce compared with the outgoing 991 GT3, according to Andreas Preuninger, Porsche’s GT vehicles director, who relayed the gains to Edmunds.

Porsche 992 GT3 front
Image: Porsche

While not much has been done on the power front — Preuninger said it was hard enough just to keep the 992 GT3 naturally aspirated — another big update has been reserved for the front suspension, which ditches MacPherson struts for double wishbones derived from the 911 RSR. It’s the first time such a setup has been fitted to a roadgoing 911, and it should keep the tires even more planted through the bends.

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It won’t be long until the new GT3 bows in true production-ready trim, but this sneak peek offers little to complain about, stylistically. And, being a 911 GT3, it’ll probably be a dream to drive, too. Not anticipating any surprises there.

Staff Writer at Jalopnik. 2017 Fiesta ST. Wishes NASCAR was more like Daytona USA.

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DISCUSSION

smalleyxb122
smalleyxb122

The revelation that a wing works better mounted from its topside than on a pedestal is the worst thing to happen to supercar styling since NACA ducts. Just as we have come to accept the aesthetic shortcomings of NACA ducts because of their function, so too will the hanging wing become styling shorthand for performance as it trickles down to cars that will see no benefit from the marginally increased efficiency.

I can appreciate function-over-form, but I can also acknowledge what is being sacrificed by form in the trade.