Screenshot: Lego (YouTube)

I know you’re out there, Lego fans. I know plenty of y’all also spent long hours of your childhood piecing together the luxury cars of your dreams long before you even knew how to read an RPM gauge, pretending your little Lego self was actually driving a super-sleek Ferrari. Well, boys and girls, Bugatti has decided to make those childhood dreams come true. They’ve teamed up with Lego to create a 1:1-scale Bugatti Chiron that actually drives.

You read that right, folks. This isn’t just some Lego skin. This is not merely a Lego shell. This is an actual, real, Bugatti Chiron, except 90 percent of it is carefully constructed from more than one million Lego Technic pieces.

There are only a handful of things that aren’t Lego-made. The metal front and rear subframes that support the Chiron’s actual wheels and tires are the only pieces you’d find on the supercar you’re used to. That’s pretty damn impressive.

Yeah. That mean the engines are Lego, too.

According to Car and Driver, Lego replaced the W-16 engine with 2,304 electric Technic motors that function through 4,032 Technic gears. They’re not, uh, getting the same kind of power you’re used to from a supercar like a Bugatti, though. You’re not gonna go 261 mph in the Lego car. All those engines total a mere 5.3 horsepower for a grand total of… a twelve mph top speed.

But, I mean, this isn’t a car you’re driving to go fast. This is a car you’re driving so you can say you drove a Lego Bugatti.

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Lego didn’t go the easy route, either. They could have glued the body together to ensure maximum hold; but, no, each and every one of those million pieces were hand-assembled. Try not to back into a telephone pole in this bad boy; you’d be demolishing the astounding 13,000 hours of manpower it took to craft this beauty. And, at 3,306 lbs, it even weighs about 1000 lbs less than the actual Chiron.

To make sure their version of the Chiron looked true to life, the brains behind Lego got together and dreamed up some brand new technology. The body is made out of a flexible Technic skin held to the body with—you guessed it—Technic screws. They even introduced their first ever clear pieces for the headlights.

You can’t actually buy this thing, which breaks my already-student-loan-heavy heart. It has two functional, actual seats. I could impress so many dates. But for now, we all just have to be content with the fact that we can drool over this bad boy from a distance and pray one day our utopian future will include more easily accessible luxury Lego machines.